Archiv der Kategorie: United Nations

How Germany advocates for the protection of aid workers in the Security Council

How Germany advocates for the protection of aid workers in the Security Council

By Dr. Charlotte Dany

Germany has made the facilitation of humanitarian aid to one of its headline goals for its 2-year seat on the UN Security Council from 2019-2020, and a main theme for its shared Security Council Presidency with France in March and April this year. With this move, Germany decidedly contributed to make the delivery of relief to suffering populations an issue of ‘high politics’. It gives humanitarian aid the salience it deserves, given the rising needs of people in humanitarian crises, as well as the constant violation of humanitarian law. Germany in particular focuses on protecting aid workers by promoting the humanitarian principles. However, this approach is insufficient and contradicted by other international humanitarian aid policies.

The rising civilian casualties of extended wars and armed conflicts, as well as increasingly deadly natural disasters make humanitarian aid an ever-more important issue of international peace and humanitarian politics. However, despite this rising need for humanitarian assistance, providing aid becomes increasingly dangerous and impossible in certain high-risk environments. Targeted attacks against aid workers and infrastructure are a constant problem, which receives increasing attention.

Aid workers are killed, injured or kidnapped, mostly in South Sudan, Afghanistan, Syria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Somalia. According to the Aid Workers Security Report 2017 by the Humanitarian Outcomes research and consultancy group, perpetrators are dominantly non-state armed groups. Moreover, aerial bombings by Russia and the United States killed a particularly large number of aid workers and destroyed medical facilities in Syria and Yemen. At the beginning of April 2019, Germany and France reported “139 attacks on medical facilities last year, in which more than 300 people were killed or injured” in Syria alone. Humanitarian Outcomes ranks South Sudan as the most dangerous place for aid workers, documenting an especially steep increase of violent attacks between 2016 and 2018.

Protection of aid workers as main objective

In such situations, humanitarian aid organizations may decide to withdraw their staff fully from certain countries or regions because of the attacks, as Médecins Sans Frontières did in Afghanistan in 2004 and Somalia in 2013. This is particularly worrisome as the local population often remains highly dependent on humanitarian assistance: Following its independence in 2011, South Sudan, for instance, experienced a violent civil war that cost the lives of hundreds of thousands and displaced millions of people. To make matters worse, famines contributed to the complex humanitarian crisis. Attacks against aid workers therefore do not only hurt the aid workers and organizations, but they also contribute to the suffering of already highly vulnerable people in conflict zones. The attacks effectively prohibit access to affected populations and lead to a deterioration of the situation for a wide group of people.

Therefore, it is highly justified that Germany, for its two-year term on the UN Security Council as well as its shared German-French Presidency in March and April this year, focuses on the promotion of the humanitarian system. This accords with Germany’s and other state’s increasing willingness to allocate more resources for humanitarian assistance, among others in Syria, Chad, Iraq, and Yemen. To make sure that these resources actually reach those in need, it is necessary to protect aid workers. Foreign Minister Heiko Maas consequently advocates for the protection of humanitarian aid workers and humanitarian aid infrastructure, alongside facilitating access to affected populations in armed conflicts and strengthening the application of humanitarian law

Protecting aid workers through enhancing the humanitarian principles?

Germany’s approach to protecting aid workers centrally focuses on strengthening the humanitarian principles of neutrality, impartiality, and independence. In his speech at the UN Security Council on April 1st 2019, Minister Maas emphasized that these humanitarian principles „are not an end in themselves. They protect the lives of aid workers – and the people they help”. He therefore suggested to provide better information on international humanitarian law and the humanitarian principles, and to sanction norm violations.

While he announced more concrete measures for the coming months, so far Minister Maas mostly advocates to improve knowledge: knowledge of the attacks, for example through Fact Finding Missions, as well as knowledge of the humanitarian principles and international humanitarian law. Yet, while increasing knowledge is certainly important and laudable, the focus on the humanitarian principles is insufficient, in particular when it is undermined by other policies that affect humanitarian aid.  Indeed, Germany’s broader humanitarian aid policies, also in the context of recent EU and UN strategies, risk undermining the intention to protect the lives of aid workers.

The problem of protective principles

Foreign Minister Heiko Maas follows a widespread assumption on the security of aid workers: namely, that the humanitarian principles serve as ‘protective shields’ against attacks. Sticking to the humanitarian principles, visibly showing the insignia of humanitarian aid (such as the Red Cross), as well as teaching others about these principles ought to ensure that aid workers in the course of helping others, as well as their hospitals and trucks, do not become targets. In turn, it is commonly assumed that attacks occur, because the humanitarian principles disintegrate, for example through processes of politicization and militarization.

Politicization refers to the observation that humanitarian aid has become an instrument of foreign policy, more recently during the Global War on Terror. Militarization means that, consequently, the actions of humanitarian and military actors blur. Thus, the humanitarian principles should most importantly ensure that aid workers keep their separate identity, as best as possible, to avoid a blurring of lines between them and the actions of states and military actors. Especially in the view of humanitarian aid organizations, such a commingling is the main problem for the security of aid workers. Ironically, Germany’s and the EU’s humanitarian aid policies, as well as UN counterterrorism policies contributed to the problem in the past years.

The EU promoted the integration of humanitarian aid in a comprehensive security strategy in its Comprehensive Approach, thereby blurring the lines of military actions, development cooperation, and humanitarian aid. In addition, the EU and also Germany strongly focus on the prevention of conflicts, whereby humanitarian aid becomes a means of conflict prevention. For example, it may contribute to reducing the causes of flight and migration (Fluchtursachenbekämpfung). However, the use of humanitarian aid for conflict resolution or as an instrument to reach foreign policy goals reinforces the politicization of humanitarian aid, as well as it increases its militarization.

For this reason, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) very recently objected the UNSC Counterterrorism Resolution 2462 (2019), as it “can criminalize and restrict humanitarian action”. These international and national policies affect humanitarian aid practice and illustrate the tension between Germany’s willingness to protect aid workers and its tendency to blur the lines between political, military and humanitarian action.

In sum, while Germany insists on promoting the humanitarian principles to secure aid workers, its policies include humanitarian aid as tools for conflict prevention and conflict resolution, thereby risking to contribute to a further blurring of lines between humanitarian and military action that causes at least some of the security problems in the first place. To achieve more security for aid workers, Germany should focus on keeping humanitarian aid separate from military actions and avoid being part of the problem.

This article was first published on the PRIF-Blog.
We are glad to have the permission to repost it here.
Link: https://blog.prif.org/2019/05/14/how-germany-advocates-for-the-protections-of-aid-workers-in-the-security-council/

 

Dr. Charlotte Dany

Dr. Charlotte Dany is Managing Director of the Peace Academy Rhineland-Palatinate (Friedensakademie Rheinland-Pfalz) at the University of Koblenz-Landau. Formerly, she was a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer at Goethe-University Frankfurt and holds a Ph.D. from the University of Bremen. Charlotte Dany is an expert on humanitarian aid, development cooperation, information and communication politics, as well as on the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in global governance.

Mehr Schein als Sein. Geschlechtergerechtigkeit in den Vereinten Nationen

Mehr Schein als Sein. Geschlechtergerechtigkeit in den Vereinten Nationen

Von Manuela Scheuermann 

Die Vereinten Nationen  bemühen sich redlich, Maßnahmen zu mehr Geschlechtergerechtigkeit in allen Teilen der Welt anzustoßen. Doch sie selbst verharren  in tradierten Mustern – mit tiefgreifenden Folgen für die Geschlechtergleichheit in der eigenen Organisation. Mögen jüngste Entwicklungen, wie die Geschlechterparität in einigen großen Sonderorganisationen, ein positiveres Bild einer gender-sensiblen UN zeichnen, so zeigt doch gerade der wichtige Tätigkeitsbereich „Frieden und Sicherheit“, dass die UN noch einen langen Weg vor sich haben. Systemische Hindernisse auf politischer und bürokratischer Ebene verhindern Geschlechtergerechtigkeit innerhalb der Weltorganisation.

Eine Weltorganisation setzt Normen

Die United Nations (UN) inszenieren sich seit geraumer Zeit als Vorreiterin, Vordenkerin und Normsetzerin für Geschlechtergerechtigkeit. Seit dem Amtsantritt von Antonio Guterres wurden die Appelle der UN an die Staatengemeinschaft, Gender-Belange ernst zu nehmen, noch lauter. Anlässlich des Weltfrauentags 2019 unterstrich der UN-Generalsekretär, die Förderung der weiblichen Hälfte der Weltbevölkerung sei essentiell für den globalen Fortschritt. Dies ist insbesondere in dem für die Vereinten Nationen konstitutiven Tätigkeitsbereich „Frieden und Sicherheit“ der Fall. Fotos von Frauen in Uniform dominieren den Internetauftritt der für Friedenssicherung zuständigen Abteilung „Department for Peace Operations“ (DPO). Die Intensivierung des „Women, Peace and Security“-Programms steht auch – und gerade durch deutsche Initiativen – während der nicht-ständigen Mitgliedschaft Deutschlands von 2019 bis 2020 im UN-Sicherheitsrat hoch auf der Tagesordnung.

Dabei dominiert im UN-Diskurs ein friedenspolitisches Narrativ von Geschlechtergerechtigkeit: der Schutz von Frauen vor sexualisierter oder gender-basierter Gewalt, die Bewahrung von Frauenrechten als Menschenrechten und der Einbezug, ja die aktive Partizipation, von Frauen in allen Phasen des Friedensprozesses als zwingende Voraussetzung für einen nachhaltigen, stabilen und positiven Frieden. Frauen werden dabei in den Friedensoperationen theoretisch mittlerweile alle Rollen zugedacht, die Männern von Beginn an zustanden. Frauen sollen als Vermittlerinnen in Friedensverhandlungen, als Kandidatinnen für Wahlen, und als Polizistinnen und Soldatinnen zu UN-Friedensoperationen beitragen. Sie alle sollen als Vorbild, als „role model“, dienen, aber auch die Kommunikation mit der weiblichen Bevölkerung in den Einsatzgebieten erleichtern. Frauen bringen einzigartige Fähigkeiten in Friedensprozesse ein. Deshalb sind Anstrengungen für Gender-Parität, Gender-Mainstreaming und Gender-Sensibilität wichtig. Das ist die Botschaft der United Nations.

Gender-Misere in UN-Friedensoperationen

Sieht man jedoch hinter diese glitzernde Fassade, zeigt bereits der Blick auf die Verhältnisse innerhalb der Weltorganisation, dass Worte und Taten noch immer stark auseinanderklaffen. Auch wenn der Anteil von Polizistinnen und zivilen UN-Mitarbeiterinnen stetig steigt, stagniert der Anteil an Soldatinnen in UN-Friedensoperationen auf niedrigem Niveau. Seit mehr als einem Jahrzehnt verharrt er bei etwa vier Prozent. Die Appelle des UN-Generalsekretärs scheinen vor allem in militärischen Belangen ungehört zu verhallen. Er mahnte anlässlich der letztjährigen Generaldebatte zu „Women, Peace and Security“ an, die UN würden sowohl ihre Glaubwürdigkeit als auch ihre Fähigkeiten zum Schutz der Zivilbevölkerung verlieren, wenn die UN-Blauhelmkontingente weiterhin fast ausschließlich männlich werden. Gerade der Schutz-Aspekt ist ein zentraler Aufgabenbereich der UN-Peacekeeper und gerade hier leisten weibliche Soldatinnen einen essentiellen Beitrag. Nachweislich sinkt die sexualisierte Gewalt gegen die weibliche Zivilbevölkerung, das Vertrauen in die UN-Friedensmission steigt und das Fehlverhalten der männlichen Peacekeeper verringert sich, wenn mehr Frauen in UN-Uniform vor Ort sind. Es ist also keineswegs nur ein Zahlenspiel, das die UN antreibt mehr Frauen als Soldatinnen in UN-Friedensoperationen zu entsenden, sondern die Überzeugung dass Frauen einen echten Mehrwert bringen – für die Kultur innerhalb der Mission und für die Friedensbemühungen vor Ort.

Männliche Institution verhindert Geschlechtergerechtigkeit

Der Schuldige dieser Gender-Balancing-Misere in UN-Friedensoperationen ist meist schnell ausgemacht: Es sind die truppenstellenden Staaten, die keine Frauen in die Operationen entsenden, so die landläufige, insbesondere von der UN vertretene Position. Dabei tragen die Vereinten Nationen, insbesondere das DPO, selbst einen beträchtlichen Anteil an dieser Gender-Misere. Die Verantwortung muss demnach bei beiden Protagonisten, den UN und den Truppenstellern, gesucht werden. Dies wird nicht so sehr auf dem sogenannten Makro-Level, also der politischen Ebene sichtbar, sondern auf dem Mikro-Level, den Mechanismen der bürokratischen Institution DPO.

Insbesondere das DPO pflegt noch immer einen auffallend männlichen Managementstil. Dadurch werden Frauen bewusst und unbewusst ausgeschlossen. Diese Praxis soll mit einigen Beispielen aus der Alltagsroutine der DPO veranschaulicht werden. Überwiegend männliche Leitungsgremien (1), gender-unsensible Auswahlprozesse bei der Besetzung von Posten (2) und – wie jüngst bekannt wurde – sexuelle Belästigung am Arbeitsplatz (3) sind immer noch an der Tagesordnung.

(1) Das mächtige, weil für alle UN-Friedensoperationen zuständige, DPO wird von sechs altgedienten Führungspersönlichkeiten geleitet, darunter nur eine Frau. Dieses mit Männern durchsetzte Bild einer Führung verwundert nicht, und dies aus vielerlei Gründen. Zum einen ist das DPO die einzige Institution der durch und durch zivilen UN, die sich mit militärischen Fragen auseinandersetzt. Folgt man feministischen Thesen wie der einer „military masculinity“, die unter anderem von Kronsell vertreten wird, wird klar, dass die Institution Militär per se maskulin ist, und ein militärisch arbeitendes DPO demnach vor allem Männer und männliche Verhaltensweisen honoriert – von der männlichen Stellenbeschreibung bis zum männlichen Führungsstil und männlichen „leader“. Zwar arbeiten die UN in vielen ihrer Nebenorgane und Programme gegen diese „Maskulinität“ an, indem sie bewusst Förderprogramme für Frauen in Leitungspositionen auflegen. Diese zeigen aber gerade im DPO wenig Effekt. Innerhalb der Missionen kommt noch eine weitere Herausforderung hinzu, die Frauen geradezu abschreckt, in einer Führungsposition zu dienen. In den UN herrscht die Praxis vor, Leitungspositionen in UN-Friedensoperationen gewohnheitsmäßig als „no family duty“ zu kennzeichnen – also die Mitnahme von Familienangehörigen zu untersagen. Dies mag in hoch volatilen Gebieten seinen Sinn haben, möchte man die Familie nicht den Gefahren aussetzen, die gewaltsame Konflikt mit sich bringen. In Missionen, die eher beobachtender Natur sind macht das schlicht keinen Sinn. Beachtet man dabei noch, dass Leitungspositionen stets mehrjährige Stehzeiten bedeuten, die wenigsten Frau jedoch für zwei oder mehr Jahre von ihrer Familie getrennt sein möchten, liegt in UN-Friedensmissionen letztendlich eine doppelte Diskriminierung vor: die der Frau und die der Mutter.

(2) Weitere Hinderungsgründe für die Partizipation von Frauen im DPO sind die generell „männlich“ definierten Anforderungen und die Besetzungspraxis innerhalb der UN. Beispielsweise werden die Aufgaben, die im DPO und im Feld geleistet werden müssen in den Stellengesuchen der UN oftmals in einen ausgesprochen militärischen Sprachjargon eingebettet. Das ist selbst bei zivilen Tätigkeiten der Fall. Zivile Frauen werden dadurch häufig abgeschreckt. Zudem führt eine von Männern dominierte Besetzungspraxis dazu, dass Frauen zumeist auf den unteren Karrierebenen verharren. In den UN erfolgen interne Besetzungen nämlich durch informelles Mentoring – in der Regel von Mann zu Mann. Männliche Einsteiger werden von männlichen Abteilungsleitern gecoacht und für neue Positionen vorgeschlagen. Frauen bleiben in diesem männlichen Netzwerk außen vor.

(3) Dazu kommt ein die gesamte UN schwächendes System der Herabwürdigung von Frauen. Wie jüngste Studien belegen, ist sexuelle Belästigung an der Tagesordnung. Eine unter allen UN-Mitarbeiter_innen durchgeführte Befragung kam zu dem Ergebnis, dass ein Drittel des UN-Staff sexuelle Belästigung am Arbeitsplatz erlebt hat. Dass nur 17 Prozent der 30.000 UN-Mitarbeiter_innen die Umfrage beantwortet hat, spricht nach Ansicht des UN-Generalsekretärs Bände. „The Guardian“ spricht in einem Artikel im Januar 2019 in Bezug auf sexuelle Belästigung in der UN von einer “Kultur der Straflosigkeit”. Die Vereinten Nationen haben ein systemisches Diskriminierungsproblem. Und dies obwohl sich die UN mit angeblich hocheffektiven Programmen gegen Diskriminierung am Arbeitsplatz schmücken.

Ausblick

Diese systemischen Stolpersteine auf dem Weg zu Gendergerechtigkeit sind den Vereinten Nationen durchaus bewusst und in vielen nicht-militärischen Bereichen sind überraschend positive Schritte hin zu Geschlechterparität zu beobachten. Doch wird sich die tiefgreifende Ungerechtigkeit, die sich besonders im DPO beobachten lässt, auch in Zukunft schwer ändern lassen. Die Vereinten Nationen sind von Männern gegründet, ein „Männerverein“ mit einer männlichen Kultur und auf einem männlichen institutionellen Pfad, von dem sie nur schwer abkehren können. Das wiegt im DPO, einer zusätzlich noch militärisch institutionalisierten Abteilung, noch schwerer.

Es muss deshalb nicht verwundern  dass – folgt man Hochrechnung der UN – das DPO Geschlechterparität frühestens im Jahre 2182 erreichen wird. Es sind die alten, einer militärisch arbeitenden Institution traditionell inhärenten Pfade, die eine geschlechtergerechte Öffnung des UN-Apparats im Bereich von Frieden und Sicherheit verhindern. Es sind eben nicht nur die offensichtlichen, entschuldigend und anklagend angeführten Argumente, allen voran der Mangel an weiblichen Soldatinnen in den truppenstellenden Nationen, die der Geschlechtergerechtigkeit im Wege stehen. Das DPO ist noch immer eine militärisch-maskuline Einrichtung. Das wird wahrscheinlich auch weiterhin so bleiben – mit allen entsprechenden Auswirkungen für einen nachhaltigen, stabilen und positiven Frieden.

 

Foto: Gerd Bayer

Dr. Manuela Scheuermann ist Post-Doc und wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Jean-Monnet-Lehrstuhl des Instituts für Politikwissenschaft und Soziologie der Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg. Sie beschäftigt sich mit Gender-Normen in internationalen Sicherheitsorganisationen, inter-organisationalen Beziehungen und den Vereinten Nationen