Archiv der Kategorie: Zivile Konfliktbearbeitung

How Germany advocates for the protection of aid workers in the Security Council

How Germany advocates for the protection of aid workers in the Security Council

By Dr. Charlotte Dany

Germany has made the facilitation of humanitarian aid to one of its headline goals for its 2-year seat on the UN Security Council from 2019-2020, and a main theme for its shared Security Council Presidency with France in March and April this year. With this move, Germany decidedly contributed to make the delivery of relief to suffering populations an issue of ‘high politics’. It gives humanitarian aid the salience it deserves, given the rising needs of people in humanitarian crises, as well as the constant violation of humanitarian law. Germany in particular focuses on protecting aid workers by promoting the humanitarian principles. However, this approach is insufficient and contradicted by other international humanitarian aid policies.

The rising civilian casualties of extended wars and armed conflicts, as well as increasingly deadly natural disasters make humanitarian aid an ever-more important issue of international peace and humanitarian politics. However, despite this rising need for humanitarian assistance, providing aid becomes increasingly dangerous and impossible in certain high-risk environments. Targeted attacks against aid workers and infrastructure are a constant problem, which receives increasing attention.

Aid workers are killed, injured or kidnapped, mostly in South Sudan, Afghanistan, Syria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Somalia. According to the Aid Workers Security Report 2017 by the Humanitarian Outcomes research and consultancy group, perpetrators are dominantly non-state armed groups. Moreover, aerial bombings by Russia and the United States killed a particularly large number of aid workers and destroyed medical facilities in Syria and Yemen. At the beginning of April 2019, Germany and France reported “139 attacks on medical facilities last year, in which more than 300 people were killed or injured” in Syria alone. Humanitarian Outcomes ranks South Sudan as the most dangerous place for aid workers, documenting an especially steep increase of violent attacks between 2016 and 2018.

Protection of aid workers as main objective

In such situations, humanitarian aid organizations may decide to withdraw their staff fully from certain countries or regions because of the attacks, as Médecins Sans Frontières did in Afghanistan in 2004 and Somalia in 2013. This is particularly worrisome as the local population often remains highly dependent on humanitarian assistance: Following its independence in 2011, South Sudan, for instance, experienced a violent civil war that cost the lives of hundreds of thousands and displaced millions of people. To make matters worse, famines contributed to the complex humanitarian crisis. Attacks against aid workers therefore do not only hurt the aid workers and organizations, but they also contribute to the suffering of already highly vulnerable people in conflict zones. The attacks effectively prohibit access to affected populations and lead to a deterioration of the situation for a wide group of people.

Therefore, it is highly justified that Germany, for its two-year term on the UN Security Council as well as its shared German-French Presidency in March and April this year, focuses on the promotion of the humanitarian system. This accords with Germany’s and other state’s increasing willingness to allocate more resources for humanitarian assistance, among others in Syria, Chad, Iraq, and Yemen. To make sure that these resources actually reach those in need, it is necessary to protect aid workers. Foreign Minister Heiko Maas consequently advocates for the protection of humanitarian aid workers and humanitarian aid infrastructure, alongside facilitating access to affected populations in armed conflicts and strengthening the application of humanitarian law

Protecting aid workers through enhancing the humanitarian principles?

Germany’s approach to protecting aid workers centrally focuses on strengthening the humanitarian principles of neutrality, impartiality, and independence. In his speech at the UN Security Council on April 1st 2019, Minister Maas emphasized that these humanitarian principles „are not an end in themselves. They protect the lives of aid workers – and the people they help”. He therefore suggested to provide better information on international humanitarian law and the humanitarian principles, and to sanction norm violations.

While he announced more concrete measures for the coming months, so far Minister Maas mostly advocates to improve knowledge: knowledge of the attacks, for example through Fact Finding Missions, as well as knowledge of the humanitarian principles and international humanitarian law. Yet, while increasing knowledge is certainly important and laudable, the focus on the humanitarian principles is insufficient, in particular when it is undermined by other policies that affect humanitarian aid.  Indeed, Germany’s broader humanitarian aid policies, also in the context of recent EU and UN strategies, risk undermining the intention to protect the lives of aid workers.

The problem of protective principles

Foreign Minister Heiko Maas follows a widespread assumption on the security of aid workers: namely, that the humanitarian principles serve as ‘protective shields’ against attacks. Sticking to the humanitarian principles, visibly showing the insignia of humanitarian aid (such as the Red Cross), as well as teaching others about these principles ought to ensure that aid workers in the course of helping others, as well as their hospitals and trucks, do not become targets. In turn, it is commonly assumed that attacks occur, because the humanitarian principles disintegrate, for example through processes of politicization and militarization.

Politicization refers to the observation that humanitarian aid has become an instrument of foreign policy, more recently during the Global War on Terror. Militarization means that, consequently, the actions of humanitarian and military actors blur. Thus, the humanitarian principles should most importantly ensure that aid workers keep their separate identity, as best as possible, to avoid a blurring of lines between them and the actions of states and military actors. Especially in the view of humanitarian aid organizations, such a commingling is the main problem for the security of aid workers. Ironically, Germany’s and the EU’s humanitarian aid policies, as well as UN counterterrorism policies contributed to the problem in the past years.

The EU promoted the integration of humanitarian aid in a comprehensive security strategy in its Comprehensive Approach, thereby blurring the lines of military actions, development cooperation, and humanitarian aid. In addition, the EU and also Germany strongly focus on the prevention of conflicts, whereby humanitarian aid becomes a means of conflict prevention. For example, it may contribute to reducing the causes of flight and migration (Fluchtursachenbekämpfung). However, the use of humanitarian aid for conflict resolution or as an instrument to reach foreign policy goals reinforces the politicization of humanitarian aid, as well as it increases its militarization.

For this reason, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) very recently objected the UNSC Counterterrorism Resolution 2462 (2019), as it “can criminalize and restrict humanitarian action”. These international and national policies affect humanitarian aid practice and illustrate the tension between Germany’s willingness to protect aid workers and its tendency to blur the lines between political, military and humanitarian action.

In sum, while Germany insists on promoting the humanitarian principles to secure aid workers, its policies include humanitarian aid as tools for conflict prevention and conflict resolution, thereby risking to contribute to a further blurring of lines between humanitarian and military action that causes at least some of the security problems in the first place. To achieve more security for aid workers, Germany should focus on keeping humanitarian aid separate from military actions and avoid being part of the problem.

This article was first published on the PRIF-Blog.
We are glad to have the permission to repost it here.
Link: https://blog.prif.org/2019/05/14/how-germany-advocates-for-the-protections-of-aid-workers-in-the-security-council/

 

Dr. Charlotte Dany

Dr. Charlotte Dany is Managing Director of the Peace Academy Rhineland-Palatinate (Friedensakademie Rheinland-Pfalz) at the University of Koblenz-Landau. Formerly, she was a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer at Goethe-University Frankfurt and holds a Ph.D. from the University of Bremen. Charlotte Dany is an expert on humanitarian aid, development cooperation, information and communication politics, as well as on the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in global governance.

Mehr Schein als Sein. Geschlechtergerechtigkeit in den Vereinten Nationen

Mehr Schein als Sein. Geschlechtergerechtigkeit in den Vereinten Nationen

Von Manuela Scheuermann 

Die Vereinten Nationen  bemühen sich redlich, Maßnahmen zu mehr Geschlechtergerechtigkeit in allen Teilen der Welt anzustoßen. Doch sie selbst verharren  in tradierten Mustern – mit tiefgreifenden Folgen für die Geschlechtergleichheit in der eigenen Organisation. Mögen jüngste Entwicklungen, wie die Geschlechterparität in einigen großen Sonderorganisationen, ein positiveres Bild einer gender-sensiblen UN zeichnen, so zeigt doch gerade der wichtige Tätigkeitsbereich „Frieden und Sicherheit“, dass die UN noch einen langen Weg vor sich haben. Systemische Hindernisse auf politischer und bürokratischer Ebene verhindern Geschlechtergerechtigkeit innerhalb der Weltorganisation.

Eine Weltorganisation setzt Normen

Die United Nations (UN) inszenieren sich seit geraumer Zeit als Vorreiterin, Vordenkerin und Normsetzerin für Geschlechtergerechtigkeit. Seit dem Amtsantritt von Antonio Guterres wurden die Appelle der UN an die Staatengemeinschaft, Gender-Belange ernst zu nehmen, noch lauter. Anlässlich des Weltfrauentags 2019 unterstrich der UN-Generalsekretär, die Förderung der weiblichen Hälfte der Weltbevölkerung sei essentiell für den globalen Fortschritt. Dies ist insbesondere in dem für die Vereinten Nationen konstitutiven Tätigkeitsbereich „Frieden und Sicherheit“ der Fall. Fotos von Frauen in Uniform dominieren den Internetauftritt der für Friedenssicherung zuständigen Abteilung „Department for Peace Operations“ (DPO). Die Intensivierung des „Women, Peace and Security“-Programms steht auch – und gerade durch deutsche Initiativen – während der nicht-ständigen Mitgliedschaft Deutschlands von 2019 bis 2020 im UN-Sicherheitsrat hoch auf der Tagesordnung.

Dabei dominiert im UN-Diskurs ein friedenspolitisches Narrativ von Geschlechtergerechtigkeit: der Schutz von Frauen vor sexualisierter oder gender-basierter Gewalt, die Bewahrung von Frauenrechten als Menschenrechten und der Einbezug, ja die aktive Partizipation, von Frauen in allen Phasen des Friedensprozesses als zwingende Voraussetzung für einen nachhaltigen, stabilen und positiven Frieden. Frauen werden dabei in den Friedensoperationen theoretisch mittlerweile alle Rollen zugedacht, die Männern von Beginn an zustanden. Frauen sollen als Vermittlerinnen in Friedensverhandlungen, als Kandidatinnen für Wahlen, und als Polizistinnen und Soldatinnen zu UN-Friedensoperationen beitragen. Sie alle sollen als Vorbild, als „role model“, dienen, aber auch die Kommunikation mit der weiblichen Bevölkerung in den Einsatzgebieten erleichtern. Frauen bringen einzigartige Fähigkeiten in Friedensprozesse ein. Deshalb sind Anstrengungen für Gender-Parität, Gender-Mainstreaming und Gender-Sensibilität wichtig. Das ist die Botschaft der United Nations.

Gender-Misere in UN-Friedensoperationen

Sieht man jedoch hinter diese glitzernde Fassade, zeigt bereits der Blick auf die Verhältnisse innerhalb der Weltorganisation, dass Worte und Taten noch immer stark auseinanderklaffen. Auch wenn der Anteil von Polizistinnen und zivilen UN-Mitarbeiterinnen stetig steigt, stagniert der Anteil an Soldatinnen in UN-Friedensoperationen auf niedrigem Niveau. Seit mehr als einem Jahrzehnt verharrt er bei etwa vier Prozent. Die Appelle des UN-Generalsekretärs scheinen vor allem in militärischen Belangen ungehört zu verhallen. Er mahnte anlässlich der letztjährigen Generaldebatte zu „Women, Peace and Security“ an, die UN würden sowohl ihre Glaubwürdigkeit als auch ihre Fähigkeiten zum Schutz der Zivilbevölkerung verlieren, wenn die UN-Blauhelmkontingente weiterhin fast ausschließlich männlich werden. Gerade der Schutz-Aspekt ist ein zentraler Aufgabenbereich der UN-Peacekeeper und gerade hier leisten weibliche Soldatinnen einen essentiellen Beitrag. Nachweislich sinkt die sexualisierte Gewalt gegen die weibliche Zivilbevölkerung, das Vertrauen in die UN-Friedensmission steigt und das Fehlverhalten der männlichen Peacekeeper verringert sich, wenn mehr Frauen in UN-Uniform vor Ort sind. Es ist also keineswegs nur ein Zahlenspiel, das die UN antreibt mehr Frauen als Soldatinnen in UN-Friedensoperationen zu entsenden, sondern die Überzeugung dass Frauen einen echten Mehrwert bringen – für die Kultur innerhalb der Mission und für die Friedensbemühungen vor Ort.

Männliche Institution verhindert Geschlechtergerechtigkeit

Der Schuldige dieser Gender-Balancing-Misere in UN-Friedensoperationen ist meist schnell ausgemacht: Es sind die truppenstellenden Staaten, die keine Frauen in die Operationen entsenden, so die landläufige, insbesondere von der UN vertretene Position. Dabei tragen die Vereinten Nationen, insbesondere das DPO, selbst einen beträchtlichen Anteil an dieser Gender-Misere. Die Verantwortung muss demnach bei beiden Protagonisten, den UN und den Truppenstellern, gesucht werden. Dies wird nicht so sehr auf dem sogenannten Makro-Level, also der politischen Ebene sichtbar, sondern auf dem Mikro-Level, den Mechanismen der bürokratischen Institution DPO.

Insbesondere das DPO pflegt noch immer einen auffallend männlichen Managementstil. Dadurch werden Frauen bewusst und unbewusst ausgeschlossen. Diese Praxis soll mit einigen Beispielen aus der Alltagsroutine der DPO veranschaulicht werden. Überwiegend männliche Leitungsgremien (1), gender-unsensible Auswahlprozesse bei der Besetzung von Posten (2) und – wie jüngst bekannt wurde – sexuelle Belästigung am Arbeitsplatz (3) sind immer noch an der Tagesordnung.

(1) Das mächtige, weil für alle UN-Friedensoperationen zuständige, DPO wird von sechs altgedienten Führungspersönlichkeiten geleitet, darunter nur eine Frau. Dieses mit Männern durchsetzte Bild einer Führung verwundert nicht, und dies aus vielerlei Gründen. Zum einen ist das DPO die einzige Institution der durch und durch zivilen UN, die sich mit militärischen Fragen auseinandersetzt. Folgt man feministischen Thesen wie der einer „military masculinity“, die unter anderem von Kronsell vertreten wird, wird klar, dass die Institution Militär per se maskulin ist, und ein militärisch arbeitendes DPO demnach vor allem Männer und männliche Verhaltensweisen honoriert – von der männlichen Stellenbeschreibung bis zum männlichen Führungsstil und männlichen „leader“. Zwar arbeiten die UN in vielen ihrer Nebenorgane und Programme gegen diese „Maskulinität“ an, indem sie bewusst Förderprogramme für Frauen in Leitungspositionen auflegen. Diese zeigen aber gerade im DPO wenig Effekt. Innerhalb der Missionen kommt noch eine weitere Herausforderung hinzu, die Frauen geradezu abschreckt, in einer Führungsposition zu dienen. In den UN herrscht die Praxis vor, Leitungspositionen in UN-Friedensoperationen gewohnheitsmäßig als „no family duty“ zu kennzeichnen – also die Mitnahme von Familienangehörigen zu untersagen. Dies mag in hoch volatilen Gebieten seinen Sinn haben, möchte man die Familie nicht den Gefahren aussetzen, die gewaltsame Konflikt mit sich bringen. In Missionen, die eher beobachtender Natur sind macht das schlicht keinen Sinn. Beachtet man dabei noch, dass Leitungspositionen stets mehrjährige Stehzeiten bedeuten, die wenigsten Frau jedoch für zwei oder mehr Jahre von ihrer Familie getrennt sein möchten, liegt in UN-Friedensmissionen letztendlich eine doppelte Diskriminierung vor: die der Frau und die der Mutter.

(2) Weitere Hinderungsgründe für die Partizipation von Frauen im DPO sind die generell „männlich“ definierten Anforderungen und die Besetzungspraxis innerhalb der UN. Beispielsweise werden die Aufgaben, die im DPO und im Feld geleistet werden müssen in den Stellengesuchen der UN oftmals in einen ausgesprochen militärischen Sprachjargon eingebettet. Das ist selbst bei zivilen Tätigkeiten der Fall. Zivile Frauen werden dadurch häufig abgeschreckt. Zudem führt eine von Männern dominierte Besetzungspraxis dazu, dass Frauen zumeist auf den unteren Karrierebenen verharren. In den UN erfolgen interne Besetzungen nämlich durch informelles Mentoring – in der Regel von Mann zu Mann. Männliche Einsteiger werden von männlichen Abteilungsleitern gecoacht und für neue Positionen vorgeschlagen. Frauen bleiben in diesem männlichen Netzwerk außen vor.

(3) Dazu kommt ein die gesamte UN schwächendes System der Herabwürdigung von Frauen. Wie jüngste Studien belegen, ist sexuelle Belästigung an der Tagesordnung. Eine unter allen UN-Mitarbeiter_innen durchgeführte Befragung kam zu dem Ergebnis, dass ein Drittel des UN-Staff sexuelle Belästigung am Arbeitsplatz erlebt hat. Dass nur 17 Prozent der 30.000 UN-Mitarbeiter_innen die Umfrage beantwortet hat, spricht nach Ansicht des UN-Generalsekretärs Bände. „The Guardian“ spricht in einem Artikel im Januar 2019 in Bezug auf sexuelle Belästigung in der UN von einer “Kultur der Straflosigkeit”. Die Vereinten Nationen haben ein systemisches Diskriminierungsproblem. Und dies obwohl sich die UN mit angeblich hocheffektiven Programmen gegen Diskriminierung am Arbeitsplatz schmücken.

Ausblick

Diese systemischen Stolpersteine auf dem Weg zu Gendergerechtigkeit sind den Vereinten Nationen durchaus bewusst und in vielen nicht-militärischen Bereichen sind überraschend positive Schritte hin zu Geschlechterparität zu beobachten. Doch wird sich die tiefgreifende Ungerechtigkeit, die sich besonders im DPO beobachten lässt, auch in Zukunft schwer ändern lassen. Die Vereinten Nationen sind von Männern gegründet, ein „Männerverein“ mit einer männlichen Kultur und auf einem männlichen institutionellen Pfad, von dem sie nur schwer abkehren können. Das wiegt im DPO, einer zusätzlich noch militärisch institutionalisierten Abteilung, noch schwerer.

Es muss deshalb nicht verwundern  dass – folgt man Hochrechnung der UN – das DPO Geschlechterparität frühestens im Jahre 2182 erreichen wird. Es sind die alten, einer militärisch arbeitenden Institution traditionell inhärenten Pfade, die eine geschlechtergerechte Öffnung des UN-Apparats im Bereich von Frieden und Sicherheit verhindern. Es sind eben nicht nur die offensichtlichen, entschuldigend und anklagend angeführten Argumente, allen voran der Mangel an weiblichen Soldatinnen in den truppenstellenden Nationen, die der Geschlechtergerechtigkeit im Wege stehen. Das DPO ist noch immer eine militärisch-maskuline Einrichtung. Das wird wahrscheinlich auch weiterhin so bleiben – mit allen entsprechenden Auswirkungen für einen nachhaltigen, stabilen und positiven Frieden.

 

Foto: Gerd Bayer

Dr. Manuela Scheuermann ist Post-Doc und wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Jean-Monnet-Lehrstuhl des Instituts für Politikwissenschaft und Soziologie der Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg. Sie beschäftigt sich mit Gender-Normen in internationalen Sicherheitsorganisationen, inter-organisationalen Beziehungen und den Vereinten Nationen

Soziale Verteidigung

Soziale Verteidigung

Von Christine Schweitzer

 Soziale Verteidigung ist ein Konzept des gewaltfreien Widerstandes, das für bestimmte Situationen – vor allem für Verteidigung gegen militärische Übergriffe eines anderen Landes auf das eigene – oder zur Abwehr eines Staatsstreichs entwickelt wurde. Angesichts der Pläne Deutschlands und der NATO, im Verteidigungsbereich massiv aufzurüsten, gewinnt dieses nur scheinbar utopische Konzept neue Aktualität.

Gerade Anfang der Woche war in der Presse zu lesen: Die Bundeswehr soll neu ausgerichtet werden. Zukünftig werde Landes- und Bündnisverteidigung wieder gleichrangig zu Auslandseinsätzen sein. Seit 1989 wurde Deutschland in der Regel als „nur von Freunden umgeben“ beschrieben[1]. Nun scheint sich diese Sicherheitswahrnehmung verändert zu haben. Und war es vor 1989 die Sowjetunion, so wird nun Russland als Bedrohung ausgemacht.

Brauchen wir also eine neue Abschreckungspolitik? Die Bereitschaft, notfalls einen sog. „Krieg mit allen Mitteln“ zu führen – zu denen auch Atomwaffen gehören? Obwohl man weiß, dass es bei einem solchen Krieg keine Gewinner*innen und keine Verlierer*innen geben kann, da diese Waffen (und auch schon die modernen konventionellen Waffen – man sehe sich nur die Bilder aus Syrien an) alles zerstören, was verteidigt werden soll?

Angesichts dieses Schreckensszenarios wurde schon früh nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg ein alternatives Verteidigungskonzept entwickelt: die gewaltfreie „Soziale Verteidigung“, die Methoden des zivilen Widerstands empfiehlt. Angesichts der aktuellen Pläne der Bundesregierung und der NATO zu weiterer Aufrüstung gilt es, die Idee der Sozialen Verteidigung wieder ins Gespräch zu bringen

Grundidee: Die Macht kommt von den Menschen

Das Konzept der Sozialen Verteidigung geht von einem Gedanken aus, der auch in unserer Verfassung verankert ist, nämlich dass alle Macht vom Volk ausgeht. Das heißt, sie beruht auf der Zustimmung und Kooperation der Regierten. Wenn diese Kooperation entzogen wird, dann bricht die Basis der Macht zusammen.

Auf den Fall einer militärischen Besetzung übertragen bedeutet dies, dass letztlich die Bevölkerung des angegriffenen Landes darüber entscheidet, ob ein (militärischer) Angreifer sein Ziel erreicht oder nicht. Es wird nicht das Territorium an den Landesgrenzen verteidigt, sondern die Selbstbestimmung einer Gesellschaft durch die Verweigerung der Kooperation. Eine Besatzungsmacht oder eine putschende Partei erreichen, so die Annahme, ihre Ziele nicht, wenn ihnen konsequenter gewaltfreier Widerstand entgegengesetzt wird.

Geschichte des Konzepts

Der Begriff der Sozialen Verteidigung wurde seit Ende der 50er Jahre von Friedensforscher*innen (u.a. Stephen King-Hall, Gene Sharp, Adam Roberts, April Carter und Theodor Ebert) geprägt, die nach einer alternativen, nichtmilitärischen Form der Verteidigung gegenüber der von ihnen zunächst unhinterfragt angenommenen Bedrohung durch den Warschauer Vertrag suchten. Später änderten sich die Bedrohungsanalysen, die sie ihren Arbeiten zugrunde legten. So bezogen sie Staatsstreiche und später die Möglichkeit einer Intervention ehemals befreundeter Staaten mit ein.[2]

Nach 1989 wurde es in der wissenschaftlichen Debatte um Soziale Verteidigung stiller. Auch in der öffentlichen Diskussion war Verteidigung kein Thema mehr bzw. fand höchstens „am Hindukusch“[3] statt. An die Stelle alternativer gewaltfreier Verteidigungsformen traten Konzepte gewaltfreien Eingreifens in Konflikte anderenorts. Gleichzeitig wurden aber auch etliche vergleichende wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen über zivilen Widerstand veröffentlicht, die das Wissen über Formen nichtmilitärischer Verteidigung enorm bereicherten. So wurde festgestellt, dass in den letzten einhundert Jahren gewaltfreie Aufstände doppelt so erfolgreich waren wie gewaltsame Rebellionen[4]. Zudem wurden Beispiele von Gemeinschaften identifiziert, denen es gelang, sich einem Krieg zu entziehen und ihre Lebensweise zu schützen, ohne zu der Waffe zu greifen[5].

Diese Studien bestätigen das, was schon in den Publikationen zu Sozialer Verteidigung, wenngleich basierend auf der kleinen Anzahl von Fallbeispielen, vermutet und empfohlen wurde: Die Vorbereitung auf den Widerstand, das Entziehen von Kooperation, das entschlossene Festhalten an der Gewaltlosigkeit auch angesichts massiver Repression, eher dezentrale Führungsstrukturen sind als wirkmächtige Strategien des Widerstands besonders bedeutsam. In anderen Punkten erweitern sie die frühe Forschung um wichtige Erkenntnisse darüber, wie gewaltloser oder ziviler Widerstand funktionieren kann. So verweist die Forschung über zivilen Widerstand etwa auf die zentrale Wichtigkeit des Überlaufens von Sicherheitskräften.[6]

Fazit

Es gibt bislang keinen Staat, der sich dazu entschlossen hat, sein Militär abzuschaffen und sich stattdessen auf den Fall der Sozialen Verteidigung vorzubereiten. Zwar gibt es einige Länder ohne eigenes Militär – Costa Rica und Island sind vielleicht die bekanntesten Beispiele. Diese haben jedoch Abkommen mit größeren Staaten, die für den Fall eines Angriffs die „Sicherheit“ garantieren. Island ist sogar NATO-Mitglied. Es gab in der Vergangenheit auch ein paar Regierungen, die sich vorübergehend mit Sozialer Verteidigung beschäftigten. So gab etwa Litauen 1991 entsprechende Empfehlungen an seine Bevölkerung heraus. Dies war jedoch nicht pazifistisch motiviert, sondern lag im Gegenteil daran, dass Litauen über keine militärischen Kapazitäten verfügte.

Wenn wir Soziale Verteidigung als ein Konzept begreifen, das in der politischen Debatte – in Deutschland, in allen NATO-Ländern und weltweit – als Alternative zu militärischer Verteidigung vorgeschlagen werden soll, dann sehen wir uns wenigstens zwei Herausforderungen gegenüber. Dies ist zum einen der Vorbehalt des „Unrealistischen“ – weiterhin herrscht weitgehend die Überzeugung vor, dass „nur Gewalt hilft“ – zum anderen die fehlende Zustimmung und Bereitschaft, abzurüsten.

Deshalb macht es wohl wenig Sinn, Soziale Verteidigung isoliert als Alternative zu propagieren. Zum einen hat Militär verschiedene Legitimationen. Verteidigung gegen einen Angriff ist nur eine davon. Zum anderen muss Soziale Verteidigung eingebettet werden in etwas, das ich als eine umfassende Friedenspolitik bezeichnen würde. Eine Politik, die universalistische Maßstäbe des Handelns anlegt, die auf gemeinsame Sicherheit gerichtet ist und die Frieden als Bedingung für eine lebenswerte Welt versteht. In diesem Zusammenhang ist der Hinweis darauf, dass totale Abrüstung nicht heißen muss, dass man jedem Angreifer hilflos ausgeliefert wäre, wesentlich. Eine umfassende Friedenspolitik braucht gewaltfreie Alternativen zu Rüstung und Militär, um überzeugend zu wirken. Friedensbewegungen sind oftmals stärker darin, zu benennen, was sie nicht wollen, als darin, positive Visionen zu skizzieren. Aber es stehen der Abschaffung von Rüstung und Militär nicht nur ökonomische und machtstrategische Interessen politischer und wirtschaftlicher Eliten entgegen. Viele Menschen empfinden angesichts von Kriegen und Gewalt Bedrohungsängste und echte Betroffenheit und halten folglich, Gewalt, auch militärische Gewalt, als ultima ratio für notwendig. Deshalb sind Zivile Konfliktbearbeitung, Formen gewaltfreien Eingreifens in eskalierende Konflikte, Ziviles Peacekeeping und eben auch Soziale Verteidigung so wesentlich.

Dr. Christine Schweitzer

Dr. Christine Schweitzer ist Geschäftsführerin beim Bund für Soziale Verteidigung, wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin beim  Institut für Friedensarbeit und Gewaltfreie Konfliktaustragung, Vorsitzende der War Resisters’ International und Redakteurin des vom Netzwerk Friedenskooperative herausgegebenen Friedensforum. Sie hat vielfach zu den Themen Zivile Konfliktbearbeitung, gewaltfreie Alternativen zu Rüstung und Militär und verschiedenen Konfliktregionen publiziert.

[1] Dieser Ausdruck wurde in den 1990er Jahren von verschiedenen Politiker*innen verwendet. Siehe z.B. https://www.welt.de/debatte/kommentare/plus173986742/Die-Probleme-der-Bundeswehr-sind-auch-unsere-Schuld.html.

[2] Zum Nachlesen über Soziale Verteidigung sei diese Aufsatzsammlung empfohlen: Jochheim, Gernot (Hrsg.) (1988) Soziale Verteidigung – Verteidigung mit einem menschlichen Gesicht. Eine Handreichung. Düsseldorf.

[3] Die Formulierung „Die Sicherheit Deutschlands wird auch am Hindukusch verteidigt” stammt von Verteidigungsminister Peter  Struck. Siehe https://www.heise.de/tp/features/Die-Sicherheit-Deutschlands-wird-auch-am-Hindukusch-verteidigt-3427679.html.

[4] Chenoweth, Erica und Stephan, Maria J. (2011): Why Civil Resistance Works. The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict. New York: Colombia University Press.

[5] Anderson, Mary B. und Wallace, Marshall (2013) Opting Out of War. Strategies to Prevent Violent Conflict. Boulder/London: Lynne Rienner Publishers; Saulich, Christina und Werthes, Sascha: Nonwar Communites, oder: die Vernachlässigung des Friedenspotenzials des Lokalen. In: Maximilian Lakitsch und Susanne Reitmair-Juárez (Hrsg.): Zivilgesellschaft im Konflikt: Vom Gelingen und Scheitern in Krisengebieten, 131-158. LIT Verlag, Berlin, Münster, 2016.

[6] Siehe z.B. Chenoweth, Erica & Stephan, Maria J. (2011) Why Civil Resistance Works. The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict. New York: Colombia University Press; Nepstad, Sharon Erickson (2011) Nonviolent Revolutions. Civil Resistance in the Late 20th Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Ziviles Peacekeeping – zivile Friedenssicherung

Ziviles Peacekeeping  – zivile Friedenssicherung

Von Christine Schweitzer

Beim Zivilen Peacekeeping geht es um den Schutz von Menschen vor Gewalt in Konfliktsituationen und die Prävention von Gewalt durch Präsenz von Friedensfachkräften, die unbewaffnet vor Ort aktiv sind.

Ziviles Peacekeeping (oder Unbewaffneter Ziviler Schutz – Unarmed Civil Protection, wie dieser Ansatz im Englischen heute heißt) basiert darauf, dass unbewaffnete, ausgebildete zivile Fachkräfte in einem Konfliktgebiet eine ständige Präsenz aufbauen. Sie verbinden Aktivitäten, die direkt der Gewaltprävention dienen, mit solchen, bei denen es darum geht, Konfliktparteien zusammenzubringen und die Fähigkeiten lokaler Gemeinschaften zu stärken, Gewalt-Eskalationen zu widerstehen.

Wie kann das gehen?

Viele Menschen finden es schwer zu verstehen, was unbewaffnete Friedensfachkräfte in einem gewaltsamen Umfeld erreichen können, da sie daran gewohnt sind zu denken, dass Gewalt die einzige Quelle von Schutz sein kann. Es ist wahr, dass unbewaffnete Zivilist*innen keine Mittel haben, etwas direkt zu erzwingen und sich auch nicht mit Waffengewalt verteidigen können. Sie können Angreifer*innen nicht töten oder durch Schüsse stoppen, wie Soldat*innen. Unbewaffnete Peacekeeper*innen haben jedoch ihre eigenen Quellen von Macht, und die Erfolgsbilanz der letzten Jahre gibt ihnen Recht: Unbewaffnete Peacekeeper*innen sind zum einen – zumindest bis zu einem gewissen Grad, der von Ort zu Ort unterschiedlich ist – gegen Gewalt geschützt, wenn es den Teams gelingt, vertrauensvolle Beziehungen zu allen Konfliktparteien und zu den Menschen vor Ort aufzubauen. Vorbedingung dafür sind Unparteilichkeit und Unabhängigkeit von staatlichen oder anderen partikularen Interessen, seien diese ökonomischer, missionarischer oder politischer Art. Die Tatsache, dass sie selbst relativ sicher sind, überträgt sich dann auf diejenigen Personen, die sie begleiten. Zum anderen riskiert ein*e potentielle*r Angreifer*in, dass die internationalen Friedensfachkräfte gewaltsame Übergriffe weltweit bekannt machen, und dass dies wiederum negative Folgen für den*die Angreifer*in hat. „Die Welt schaut zu“ ist oft ein wirksames Präventionsinstrument.[1]

Aufgabenbereiche

Aufgabenbereiche des Zivilen Peacekeepings sind vorrangig der Schutz der Zivilbevölkerung in Kriegssituationen; der Schutz von besonders bedrohten Gruppen und Gemeinschaften, wie z.B. Vertriebenen oder ethnischen Minderheiten, dort wo Übergriffe gegen solche Gruppen drohen; die Beobachtung von Waffenstillständen, und die Schutzbegleitung von Menschenrechtsverteidiger*innen. Darüber hinaus beteiligen sich Zivile Peacekeeper*innen aktiv am Aufbau und der Stärkung von lokalen Systemen der Frühwarnung und des frühen Handelns gegenüber drohender Gewalt.

Durchführende

Ziviles Peacekeeping wird bislang in erster Linie von Nichtregierungsorganisationen (NROs), praktiziert, darunter die Peace Brigades International (PBI), zahlreiche in Palästina tätigen NROs und die Nonviolent Peaceforce (NP). Seit mehr als fünfzehn Jahren setzt die Nonviolent Peaceforce Ziviles Peacekeeping erfolgreich in Bürgerkriegsgebieten, unter anderem auf den Philippinen, im Südsudan, Myanmar und im Nahen Osten (Irak, Syrien) ein.

Politische Anerkennung

Ziviles Peacekeeping hat durchaus internationale Anerkennung, auch auf der staatlichen Ebene, erfahren: Zum einen haben Staaten und internationale (Regierungs-)Organisationen selbst unbewaffneten Missionen durchgeführt. Beispiele sind die Truce Monitoring Group in Bougainville am Ende der 1990er Jahre und die Kosovo Verification Mission der OSZE 1998-1999. Das Gleiche gilt auch für Kirchen – man denke an die Beobachtung der Wahlen in Südafrika 1994 (EMPSA) und die Arbeit des Ökumenischen Begleitprojekts Palästina-Israel des Weltkirchenrates (EAPPI) in Palästina seit 2001.

Zum anderen wird die Arbeit der Nonviolent Peaceforce durch eine Reihe von europäischen Regierungen und die EU-Kommission seit 2003/2004 staatlich finanziert. Allerdings reichen diese Mittel bei weitem nicht aus. Die Nonviolent Peaceforce alleine könnte in viel mehr Ländern und mit viel mehr Personal tätig sein, wenn es dafür genügende und schnell verfügbare Mittel gäbe. Eine Friedensfachkraft bei Nonviolent Peaceforce kostet pro Jahr weniger als 50.000 Euro (2016 waren es, berechnet auf Basis der Gesamtausgaben der Organisation, genau 50.000 US-Dollar). Soldat*innen in Auslandseinsätzen kosten mindestens das Doppelte.[2]

Des Weiteren erfahren NROs, die Zviles Peacekeeping durchführen, staatliche Anerkennung, wenn sie von Regierungen in konfliktbetroffenen Gesellschaften eingeladen werden, um den Friedensaufbau zu unterstützen. Hier ist erneut die Nonviolent Peaceforce das wichtigste Beispiel. Sie hat in den Philippinen seit 2010 offiziellen Status in der „Zivilen Komponente“ des Internationalen Monitoring Teams, das den Friedensprozess zwischen der Regierung und MILF auf Mindanao überwacht. Im Südsudan kooperiert sie eng mit UNICEF, und auch nach Myanmar ist sie auf Einladung der Regierung in Einsatz. Schließlich hat Ziviles Peacekeeping Anerkennung bei den Vereinten Nationen gefunden. So hat die Nonviolent Peaceforce in Kooperation mit dem UN Institute for Training and Research einen e-learning Kurs über Ziviles Peacekeeping entwickelt. Des Weiteren wird das Konzept in mehreren UN-Berichten der jüngeren Zeit erwähnt, so etwa im HIPPO Bericht (ein Bericht eines Hohen Unabhängigen Panels 2015 zu Friedensoperationen), im Peace Architecture Bericht und im Women, Peace and Security Bericht zur Umsetzung von UN-Resolution 1325.

Auch die deutsche Regierung hat 2017 das Instrument anerkannt. In den Leitlinien „Krisen verhindern, Konflikte bewältigen, Frieden fördern“ heißt es: „Die Bundesregierung unterstützt die Weiterentwicklung ziviler Ansätze im Rahmen des R2P-Konzeptes und der Reform der VN-Architektur zur Friedensförderung, wie sie vom High-Level Independent Panel on United Nations Peace Operations gefordert werden. Dabei fördert sie insbesondere Ziviles Peacekeeping als erprobte Methodik, um Menschen vor Gewalt und schweren Menschenrechtsverletzungen zu schützen.“

Dr. Christine Schweitzer ist Geschäftsführerin beim Bund für Soziale Verteidigung, wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin beim Institut für Friedensarbeit und Gewaltfreie Konfliktaustragung, Vorsitzende der War Resisters’ International und Redakteurin des vom Netzwerk Friedenskooperative herausgegebenen Friedensforum. Sie hat vielfach zu den Themen Zivile Konfliktbearbeitung, gewaltfreie Alternativen zu Rüstung und Militär und verschiedenen Konfliktregionen publiziert.

Fußnoten

[1] Eine lesenswerte vergleichende Studie zu Zivilem Peacekeeping ist: Furnari, Ellen (Hrsg.) (2016): Wielding Nonviolence in the Face of Violence, Institut für Friedensarbeit und Gewaltfreie Konfliktaustragung, Norderstedt: BoD.

[2] Für deutsche Einsätze liegen keine genauen Zahlen pro Soldat*in vor. Frankreich beziffert die Kosten für seine Soldat*innen auf 100.000 Euro pro Soldat*in und Jahr.

Environmental peacebuilding: What is it good for?

Environmental peacebuilding: What is it good for?

Von Nina Engwicht

Environmental peacebuilding strives to reduce conflict risks associated with natural resources and to enable societies to profit fully from their natural resource wealth. In order to be successful, it must follow a context-sensitive approach. Nina Engwicht shows that, in Sierra Leone, the environmental risk factors for conflict have only been addressed at the surface.

Environmental peacebuilding in post-conflict societies

Policy interventions seeking to break the link between natural resource abundance and violent conflict aim to tackle the quality of environmental governance both in producer countries and global markets. Proponents of such peacebuilding efforts hold that effective reforms in conflict-prone natural resource sectors can enable transitional societies to mitigate conflict risks, build cooperative societal relations around environmental management and reap the benefits of their resource endowment. The rationale that better natural resource governance will reduce the risk for conflict and human rights violations has informed the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the EU Conflict Minerals Regulation, and many other initiatives tackling natural resource governance at the global, national and local level.

Sierra Leone: A model case?

One of the first and most prominent cases of reforms aimed at curbing the production and trade in conflict resources was in the Sierra Leonean diamond sector. During an 11-year long civil war, Sierra Leone gained sad notoriety for its trade in “blood diamonds”. Since the end of the war in 2002 the mineral sector has been thoroughly reformed. Sierra Leone was one of the first members of the Kimberley Process, which aims to regulate the global trade in rough diamonds through government-issued certificates guaranteeing that a given parcel of diamonds is “conflict free”. Sierra Leone is also a member of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, which seeks to make industry payments to governments transparent, and has been declared EITI-compliant in 2014. On the regional level, the country has harmonized its export taxes with adjacent diamond producing countries in an effort to curb smuggling. Institutional changes at the national level have been extensive. They have included legal reforms; the establishment of a National Minerals Agency charged with monitoring the implementation of regulations in the diamond sector; the development of a cadastral system; and the institution of a Diamond Area Community Development Fund, channeling back a small percentage of tax income derived from diamond exports to diamond mining communities.

At first glance, the results seem to point to an extraordinary success. Diamond exports have gone up – from an export value of only 1.2 Mio USD during the war to 158,000 Mio USD in 2016. Most importantly, diamonds have not “spoiled” the peace in Sierra Leone. The armed actors that controlled the diamond market during the war have effectively disappeared, and with them the violent modes of production and trade that characterized the market.

Lack of market oversight undermines policy goals

However, a closer look shows that many of the fundamental structures of the Sierra Leonean diamond market have hardly changed. To this day, diamond production is characterized by hundreds of thousands of impoverished artisanal miners working under miserable conditions, while the benefit of industrial mining operations to the country remains highly questionable. Large parts of the production and trade remain illegal. While illegally sourced and traded diamonds are mostly channeled into the legal market, this reveals a significant lack of state capacity in the oversight of the market.

Lastly, the structures of inequality that have characterized the market for decades and have constituted one of the root causes of the civil war remain in place. Marginalized young men hoping to escape poverty gravitate towards diamond mining, but even in the unlikely case that they find valuable gems, the prevalent systems of knowledge and power thwart their chance for upward social mobility.

A superficial look at the results of natural resource sector reforms would suggest that the main causes linking diamonds to conflict in Sierra Leone have been eradicated. This is far from the truth. If environmental peacebuilding is to be successful, it must be based on an understanding of the complexities of local configurations of governance, conflict and market structures that might prove to be extremely resilient to change.

This article first appeared on A New Climate for Peace and is republished here.

 

Playing Fair With Sanctions: Is There a Method to the Madness?

Playing Fair With Sanctions: Is There a Method to the Madness?

by Enrico Carisch

Criticisms over a lack of fairness of United Nations sanctions and inconsistencies in their application are frequent and routine — and not without justification. For decades, human-rights experts have pointed to the paradox that unreliable practices, in the words of one expert, render “the UN sanctions system noncompliant with the UN’s human rights standards.”

This unacceptable paradox is mostly due to unbridled power-politics played by the permanent-five members (P5) of the Security Council — Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States — who blunt the aspirations of the 10 elected members to correct these failures.

According to a new study by United Nations University, a wave of “47 fair process challenges to UN sanctions from 12 jurisdictions” clog courts, revealing how often individuals and companies are confronted with an assets freeze or travel ban despite questionable evidence.

Due process standards are intended to regulate how violators are listed for targeted sanctions measures and how to remove them from such lists. A major improvement was the establishment of an independent and impartial Office of the Ombudsperson in 2009, tasked with reviewing delisting requests from UN sanctions. Never loved by the P5 and because of internal personnel shifts, the office has been vacant since August 2017.

Ideally, due process is reinforced with solid evidentiary standards that help UN experts conclude who may have violated sanctions. The standards are also strengthened by reliable methodologies for the work of experts and delegations of the Security Council’s sanctions committees. Periodic lapses in methodology or evidentiary standards — caused in almost in all cases by pressure from the P5 — leave concerns about due process, sometimes in seemingly inconsequential contexts.

One recent example is the methodology section of reports by the panel of experts on South Sudan. The experts regularly omit that there is actually no arms embargo in place in South Sudan, a result of an unresolved standoff between the proponents — Britain and the US — and Russia on the opposing side.

This presents peculiar challenges to the experts’ work because their arms specialist is nevertheless mandated to “gather, examine and analyse information regarding the supply, sale or transfer of arms and related materiel, including through illicit trafficking networks.”

The obvious contradiction of monitoring illicit trafficking without an arms embargo opens up unprecedented complexities that should be addressed with a tailored methodology. So far, readers of the reports by the South Sudan expert group must guess the basis in which the arms expert categorizes trafficking networks as licit or illicit and which networks should be reported or not.

Not surprisingly, in the experts’ most recent report (S/2017/326), “networks” are variously described with adequate factual information or a tangle of innuendo. For example, a series of paragraphs describes a possible attempt to sell Panthera armored vehicles to South Sudan by a company based in Cairo. In one paragraph, the allegation is debunked by two unspecified “sources” claiming that the alleged transaction was part of an embezzlement scheme. The expert declares in the next paragraph that the role of Egypt in the conflict of South Sudan was “a frequent source of tension in the region.”

Yet nothing in the report justifies the leap from conjectures about a private company’s activities to the expert’s swipe at Egypt. When the report was published, the Egyptian delegation at the UN was justifiably enraged but received little sympathy from the P5.

It is an unfortunate reality that allegations based on unsubstantiated affiliations or circumstantial evidence are found in UN expert monitoring reports more often than they should.

The most recent case is found in the latest report of the expert group on Yemen. On the one hand, the experts say of ballistic missiles fired by Yemen’s Houthi fighters into Saudi Arabia that “as of yet, [they have] no evidence as to the identity of the supplier, or any intermediary third party.”

Yet in the next paragraph, the experts cite “the Islamic Republic of Iran as non-compliant with the UN sanctions.”

The experts base their allegation on the routine, technical recapitulation (paragraph 14 of Resolution 2216) found in many sanctions resolutions that reminds all countries to “take the necessary measures to prevent the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer of embargoed goods to targeted individuals and groups.” Because no enforceable norms defining “necessary measures” are spelled out, this provision has never been used in 20 years of UN sanctions to accuse a member state of negligence.

Nevertheless, 11 of the 15 members of the Security Council recently went along with a British draft of a resolution that reiterated the experts’ contrived allegation that the “Islamic Republic of Iran is in non-compliance.” Perhaps unaware of the potential risks to future sanctions of embracing aberrations of evidentiary norms, the 11 members joined Britain, forcing a Russian veto and then a different vote to adopt a more balanced Russian-authored resolution.

That resolution does not mention the poorly substantiated missile issue, but it correctly calls out the preponderance of evidence for the heavy humanitarian price Yemenis are paying for the Saudi bombardments on civilians.

Deteriorating methodologies reverberate throughout the structure of sanctions implementation and monitoring, as illustrated by the Libya sanctions. After the well-designed Resolution 1970 was turned into the controversial regime-change and no-fly zone Resolution 1973 in March 2011, the situation in Libya turned into a humanitarian calamity. This tragic turn of events required the Security Council in 2014 to add a sanctions-designation criterion for violators of human rights and international humanitarian law.

Yet no expert with the requisite human-rights training has ever been appointed to the Libya expert group. Given the inherent complexities of human rights and international humanitarian law investigations in conflict regions, the question remains how the experts should develop evidence against potential abusers of human rights and humanitarian law.

Perhaps the Ombudsperson vacancy and random interpretations of evidentiary standards and working methodologies are symptomatic of creeping neglect by Council members or simply a sense of being overwhelmed by the due process challenges to UN sanctions?

Concrete ideas to improve clear and fair procedures throughout the UN’s sanctions system exist. In addition to reanimating the Ombudsperson office, advocates of due process should also focus on preventing innocent individuals, companies or state officials from being targeted in the first place.

The table below summarizes ways to enhance the implementation and monitoring system of sanctions. (The table is annexed to the assessment report that the Australian government supported financially.)

This article introduces a new column, P5 Monitor, looking at how the permanent members of the UN Security Council — Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States — handle UN sanctions.

Situation Responsible sanctions actors Due process requirements
Start of mandate Expert group, sanctions committee Develop and adopt evidentiary standards, working methods for collection and handling of evidentiary material, as well as reporting standards
Decision to initiate a specific monitoring/ investigation Expert group, sanctions committee Credible prima facie information must meet reasonable standards that justify experts’ inquiries and information requests

Consider all exculpatory information

Monitoring or investigations of specific situations Expert group, sanctions committee Verify prevalence of evidence

Review exculpatory information

Ensure right of reply is provided to target, while taking all precautions to preserve the effectiveness of an eventual asset freeze and respecting any Member State’s national security prerogatives

Ensure evidence for culpability meets expert groups’ methodology standards

Reporting of findings Expert group Report all pertinent evidence, including exculpatory information

Report substance of replies by target

Describe conditions under which the right of reply was granted

Consideration of expert group reporting and evidence in confidential annexes Sanctions committee Verify that presented evidence was collected in accordance with United Nations and experts’ own methodologies and standards

Verify authenticity of reported evidence

Verify that right of reply was granted and exercised

Verify that efforts were undertaken to seek and report exculpatory information

Post-designation Sanctions committee Ensure that target is informed about designation

Ensure that target is advised about opportunity to communicate new information to the expert group

Ensure that target is aware of Focal Point and Ombudsperson

Ensure periodic review of designation criteria

Petitions to Focal Point/ Ombudsperson Sanctions committee Ensure that relevant expert group is consulted Communicate decisions and their reasons to target
Granting of exemption Sanctions committee Ensure that relevant Member States inform law enforcement organizations and related organizations about specific exemptions
Post-designation monitoring Sanctions committee, expert group Maintain continual monitoring of designee to ensure that reasons and criteria for designation remain valid
Delisting Sanctions committee Ensure that delisting decision is communicated to all relevant Member States

Ensure that all relevant United Nations documents reflect the delisting

 

This article first appeared on PassBlue and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

 

Enrico Carisch is the co-author of the just-released book “The Evolution of UN Sanctions: From a Tool of Warfare to a Tool of Peace, Security and Human Rights.” He is also a co-founder and partner of Compliance and Capacity Skills International (CCSI), a New York-based group specializing in all aspects of sanctions regimes (http://comcapint.com).

Among other organizations, Carisch has worked for the UN Security Council as a financial and natural-resources monitor and investigator on sanctions violations by individuals and entities in Africa and elsewhere. Previously, he was an investigative journalist for print and TV for 25 years.

Menschenrechtsbildung im Zeitalter der Digitalisierung

Menschenrechtsbildung im Zeitalter der Digitalisierung

Von Ulrike Zeigermann

Im Zeitalter der Digitalisierung verändern neue Technologien, digitale Medien und online-Kommunikationskanäle in rasantem Tempo die Inhalte, Methoden, pädagogischen Praxen und theoretischen Grundlagen der Menschenrechtsbildung. Worin liegen Chancen und Herausforderungen dieser Entwicklung?

Menschenrechtsbildung im Wandel

In den letzten zehn Jahren hat es einen enormen Zuwachs an digitalen Lern-, Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien gegeben, durch die mehr Menschen unabhängig von ihrer Herkunft, ihrem Bildungsabschluss, ihrem Einkommen und ihrer persönlichen Lebensumstände erreicht werden können. Mit zunehmender Digitalisierung wurden im formellen Bildungssektor an Schulen und Hochschulen sowie im informellen Bildungssektor durch Institute und Akademien in nichtstaatlicher Trägerschaft, internationale Organisationen und zivilgesellschaftliche Akteure zunehmend auch Formate mit online-basierten Ansätzen zur Menschenrechtsbildung genutzt.

Menschenrechtsbildung umfasst entsprechend der Erklärung über Menschenrechtsbildung und –training der Vereinten Nationen von 2011 das Recht auf Bildung über Menschenrechte, Bildung durch Menschenrechte und Bildung für Menschenrechte. Die Erklärung ist das Ergebnis intensiver Arbeit der Vereinten Nationen im Bereich der Menschenrechtsbildung über die letzten Jahrzehnte. Im Dezember 1994 rief die Generalversammlung der Vereinten Nationen nach der World Conference on Human Rights in the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action die UN Dekade für Menschenrechtsbildung (1995-2004) aus. Im Anschluss daran wurde das Weltprogramm für Menschenrechtsbildung ins Leben gerufen. In der ersten Phase dieses Programms (2005-2009) lag der Fokus auf Menschenrechtsbildung in der Grund- und Sekundarschulbildung. In der zweiten Programmphase (2010-2014) beschäftigte sich das Programm insbesondere mit der Hochschulbildung und Menschenrechtstrainings im öffentlichen Dienst, also von Lehrer*innen, Trainer*innen, Polizei, Militär, Justiz, öffentliche Verwaltung, Regierung und Gesundheitswesen. Die momentan laufende dritte Phase (2015-2019) soll der Stärkung und Implementierung der ersten und zweiten Projektphase dienen und beschäftigt sich besonders mit der Menschenrechtsbildung von Journalist*innen.

Abb. 1: Implementierung und Fragmentierung der Menschenrechtsbildung

 

Die Erklärung und Arbeitsprogramme der Vereinten Nationen gelten auch als Orientierung und Qualitätsstandard für die inhaltliche Ausgestaltung der Menschenrechtsbildung in Deutschland. Bereits 1980 gab die Kultusministerkonferenz eine Empfehlung zur Menschenrechtserziehung heraus, die im Jahr 2000 fast unverändert erneut beschlossen wurde und trotz der Länderhoheit zu Bildungsfragen für die gesamte Bundesrepublik gilt. Menschenrechtsbildung ist heute in den Schulgesetzen der einzelnen Bundesländer verankert und kann in allen Jahrgangsstufen in den unterschiedlichen Fächern von Sozialkunde über Ethik, Geographie, Geschichte oder Religion aufgegriffen werden (vgl. Sekretariat der ständigen Konferenz der Kultusminister der Länder in der BRD 2008).

Auf der High-level Panel Diskussion im September 2016 über die Implementierung der Erklärung der Vereinten Nationen über Menschenrechtsbildung und –training wurden praktische Erfahrungen und zukünftige Herausforderungen diskutiert sowie die Bedeutung einer globalen Menschenrechtsbildung als Voraussetzung zum Schutz und zur Gewährleistung weiterer Menschenrechte unterstrichen. Durch E-Learning-Formate sollen Zugang und Qualität der Menschenrechtsbildung in Zukunft verbessert werden.

Digitalisierung der Menschenrechtsbildung

Bereits heute werden neue digitale Angebote im Bereich der Menschenrechtsbildung zum Teil ergänzend, zum Teil an Stelle traditioneller direkter und interaktiver Kommunikation zwischen Lehrenden und Lernenden eingesetzt. Sie decken eine breite Palette von Formaten für diverse Zielgruppen auf unterschiedlichen Ebenen und in vielen Sprachen ab:

  • Für Smartphone, Tablet oder Computer gibt es Apps mit denen Menschenrechtsfragen an verschiedene Zielgruppen adressiert werden können. Die Downloadstatistiken der Hersteller deuten darauf hin, dass bis zu 50.000 Installationen vorgenommen wurden (Amnesty Mag, Stand Oktober 2017). In den meisten Fällen bleibt die Zahl der Nutzer*innen aber deutlich darunter (z.B. UN Human Rights und UDHR Human Rights jeweils 5.000–10.000, Women’s Human Rights und Geneva Human Rights Agenda jeweils 1.000–5.000 oder Human Rights Mapper und Child Rights Monitor 500 –1.000 Installationen, Stand Oktober 2017).
  • Darüber hinaus gibt es zunehmend Online-Spiele, die Abwägungsprozesse bei kritischen Menschenrechtsfragen simulieren und durch Rollenspiele für die Lage von Menschen sensibilisieren. Diverse Online-Spiele wurden zum Teil von Organen der Vereinten Nationen, wie „Against all Odds“ von UNHCR, entwickelt, aber auch von zivilgesellschaftlichen Organisationen, wie Amnesty International (RespectMyRights), DoSomething (Karma Tycoon) oder Breakthrough (ICED) entwickelt.
  • Im Bereich der Hochschulbildung werden online immer häufiger sogenannte Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) als besondere Form der Fortbildung und Erweiterung von Fähigkeiten und Wissen von Universitäten, internationalen Organisationen und Forschungsinstituten angeboten, für die sich Menschen überall auf der Welt in Kurse aus den unterschiedlichen Disziplinen und Fächergruppen einschreiben können. Im Bereich Menschenrechte, wie auch in den anderen angebotenen Fächergruppen, wird der überwiegende Anteil der Online-Kurse auf Englisch und zum Erwerb eines Zertifikats kostenpflichtig angeboten.

Die aufgeführten Beispiele für onlinebasierte Lern- und Bildungsformate zeigen, dass Menschenrechtsbildung durch neue Technologien zu diversen Themen über Grenzen hinweg verfügbar ist und der Zugang zu diesen durch das Internet erleichtert wird. Die öffentlichen Statistiken über Installationen, Spieler*innen und eingeschriebene Personen sowie Kommentare und online-Bewertungen der E-Learning Programme deuten zudem darauf hin, dass diese Formate von einem wachsenden Personenkreis genutzt werden.

Herausforderungen und Spannungsfelder

Die neuen eLearning-Angebote im Bereich Menschenrechtspolitik erweitern nicht nur den Zugang durch Zeit-, Ort- und Situationsunabhängigkeit, sondern ermöglichen prinzipiell auch lebenslanges Lernen. Für junge Menschen, die mit digitalen Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien aufgewachsen sind („Digital Natives“) können die neuen Formate ein Bildungsangebot sein, das näher an ihrer Lebensrealität ist und nebenbei zur Ausbildung technischer Qualifikationen dient, die gesellschaftlichen Teilhabe erleichtert notwendig ist. Forschung zu eLearning unterstreicht zudem,

  • dass dadurch die Qualität der Lernerfahrungen besser werden kann (Garrison 2011);
  • eLearning eine Chance für Nutzer*innen und Bildungsanbieter ist, um auf globalen Wettbewerb zu reagieren (Anderson 2008);
  • eLearning kosteneffizienter als andere Bildungsformate ist (Twigg 2013);
  • und weniger Zugangsbarrieren bestehen (Bates 2005).

Grundsätzlicher Vorteil sind die vereinfachten Möglichkeiten für internationale Interaktion und Kommunikation bei offenen Zugriff auf online-basierte Lernplattformen. Aber durchaus auch die transparente Zurechenbarkeit von Lerninhalten (Accountability).

Gleichzeitig bedeutet die Verfügbarkeit digitaler Informations- und Kommunikationstechnik (ICT) nicht automatisch mehr oder qualitativ bessere Menschenrechtsbildung oder gar gesellschaftliche Teilhabe. Die PISA-Studie von 2015 unterstreicht, dass sich sozio-ökonomisch bedingte Bildungsunterschiede in der Gesellschaft auch bei der Nutzung von ICT im Bildungssystem widerspiegeln (OECD 2015a). Es muss deshalb gefragt werden, wer von digitalen Bildungsangeboten nicht profitiert. Welche Personen haben keinen Zugang? Die Studie „Students, Computers and Learning. Making the connection“ weist darauf hin, dass ohne solide naturwissenschaftliche und literarische Grundkenntnisse die meisten digitalen Bildungsangebote nicht zielführend genutzt und umfänglich ausgeschöpft werden können (OECD 2015b). Digitale Bildungsangebote werden zumeist individuell ausgewählt, was bei potenziell abnehmendem direkten Kontakt zwischen Lehrenden und Lernenden und einer durchaus zu beobachtenden abnehmenden Regulierung des Curriculums komplexes Lernen und inhaltliches Verständnis nicht unbedingt erleichtert. Die oben angeführten Beispiele für eLearning haben außerdem gezeigt, dass diese vor allem auf Englisch und von namhaften Bildungseinrichtungen aus dem globalen Norden angeboten werden. Kritiker*innen sprechen daher von einer zunehmenden hegemonialen Monopolisierung von Bildungsinhalten, Schwerpunktsetzungen im Curriculum, Serviceangeboten sowie verstärkter technologischer und pädagogischer Uniformität.

Die Erklärung der Vereinten Nationen über Menschenrechtsbildung und -training bekräftigt, dass Staaten die Hauptverantwortung für die Förderung und Bereitstellung von Menschenrechtsbildung tragen, “die in einem Geist der Partizipation, Inklusion und Verantwortung zu entwickeln und umzusetzen ist” (Artikel 7). Gleichzeitig werden eLearning-Angebote zunehmend von privaten Anbieter*innen zur Verfügung gestellt, was ein paralleles Konkurrenzangebot zu den staatlichen Dienstleistern darstellt. Hierbei kann es zu einer Verschiebung der Bildungskosten auf die Lernenden kommen, was wiederum gesellschaftliche Ungleichheiten und neoliberale Logiken sowie den individuellen Druck nach Selbstoptimierung in lebenslangem Lernen verstärkt. eLearning kann somit auch die Gefahr der Kommerzialisierung von Lehre und Lernen verstärken. Zudem ist im Gegensatz zu klassischen Bildungsformaten bei der Nutzung von blended-Learning insbesondere der Schutz der Privatsphäre eine Herausforderung. Staaten bzw. deren öffentliche Institutionen haben eine menschenrechtliche Verantwortung (Accountability), jedoch können private, unternehmerische oder zivilgesellschaftliche Anbieter von eLearning-Formaten nach bisherigem internationalen Recht nicht für diskriminierende Praktiken oder (Daten-)Missbrauch zur Rechenschaft gezogen werden.

Abschließend lässt sich feststellen, dass Menschenrechtsbildung in den letzten Jahrzehnten kontinuierlich weiterentwickelt und im formellen und informellen Bildungssektor verbreitet wurde und heute als eigenständiges Menschenrecht diskutiert wird. Die Herausforderungen haben sich dabei im Kontext neuer digitaler Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien deutlich verändert. Das betrifft auch Anforderungen an Wissens- und Kompetenzziele (z.B. Mediensensibilität) und an eine kritische Auseinandersetzung mit Technik (z.B. Technikfolgenabschätzung, Industrialisierung 4.0). Die wesentlichen Chancen und Herausforderungen fasst Tabelle 1 noch einmal zusammen.

Tabelle 1: Das Recht auf Bildung im Kontext neuer digitaler Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien: Chancen und Herausforderungen der Menschenrechtsbildung

Chancen Risiken
Zugänglichkeit (accessibility) Lebenslanges Lernen

  •  Unabhängig von Zeit, Ort, Bildungsniveau und Lerngeschwindigkeit
  •  Individuelles und flexibles Lernen
  • Geringe Zugangsbarrieren
Zugangsbarrieren

  •  Übertragung der Bildungskosten und der Verantwortung über das Curriculum auf Lernende
  •  Individuelle und strukturelle Voraussetzungen
Adaptierbarkeit (adaptability) Vielfältiges Lernen

  • Themenvielfalt
  • Interaktives Lernen
  • Didaktische Vielfalt
  • Sprachliche Vielfalt
  • Qualität der Lernerfahrung
Internationale Anpassung

  • „Internetsprache“ Englisch
  • Technologische und pädagogische
  • Uniformität
  • Zentralisierung von Serviceangeboten
  • Inhaltliche Schwerpunktsetzung
Verfügbarkeit
(availability)
Große Reichweite

  • International
  • Nah am Alltagsleben
  • Wiederholbare Angebote
  • Unbegrenzte Anzahl von Nutzer*innen
Einschränkungen

  • Technologische, logistische und monetäre Ressourcen
  • Schutz der Privatsphäre und Gewährung von Freiheiten
  • Zielgruppenfokussierung
Angemessenheit
(adequacy)
 Bildungswettbewerb

  • Öffentliches Feedback, Austausch und offener Zugriff
  • Verbesserung der Qualität der Bildungsangebote
  • Vielfältige Lernzugriffe
Kommerzialisierung der Lehre

  • Zentralisierung von Entscheidungen
  • Druck der Selbstoptimierung
  • Marktorientierte Regulierung und Strukturierung des Angebots
  • Gefahr von Missbrauch

Fazit

Eine erste kritische Reflexion über den aktuellen Trends zur Digitalisierung der Menschenrechtsbildung zeigt, dass eLearning und der Einsatz digitaler Medien zur Menschenrechtsbildung nicht automatisch auch eine qualitative Verbesserung des Lernangebots bedeuten muss. Es gibt durchaus ernstzunehmende Bedenken, problematische Risiken und vor allem zahlreiche offene Fragen.

Weitere und umfangreichere Studien, insbesondere empirische Untersuchungen zur aktuellen Situation und Nutzung von eLearning-Angeboten, sind notwendig, um a) Qualitätsstandards entwickeln zu können sowie b) bestehende Angebote kontinuierlich entlang technologischer Innovationen aber auch entlang medienpädagogischer Erkenntnisse weiterentwickeln zu können. Mit Blick auf die normativ wünschenswerte und auch emanzipatorische Bedeutung einer für jeden Menschen zugänglichen Menschenrechtsbildung, gilt es zudem c) die notwendigen politischen und rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen zu erforschen, die ein qualitativ hochwertiges und in jeglicher Hinsicht barrierefreies (öffentliches) Angebot gewährleisten können.

Dr. Ulrike Zeigermann

Dr. Ulrike Zeigermann ist Politikwissenschaftlerin mit den Forschungsschwerpunkten Menschenrechte und vergleichende Politikfeldanalyse an der Schnittstelle von Sicherheit und Entwicklung. Bevor sie an die Friedensakademie Rheinland-Pfalz kam, promovierte Ulrike Zeigermann an der Westfälischen Universität Münster und leitete am Centre Marc Bloch in Berlin die Forschungsgruppe „Staatliches Handeln und Wissenszirkulation“. Seit November 2017 ist sie wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Lehrstuhl für Politikwissenschaft mit Schwerpunkt Nachhaltige Entwicklung der Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg.

Quellen

[1]  Anderson, Terry. 2008. The Theory and Practice of Online Learning. Athabasca University Press.

[2] Bates, Tony. 2005. Technology, E-Learning and Distance Education. Routledge.

[3] Garrison, D. Randy. 2011. E-Learning in the 21st Century: A Framework for Research and Practice. Taylor & Francis.

[4] OECD. 2015a. „Country Note GERMANY – PISA 2015“. Paris: OECD.

[5] OECD. 2015b. Students, Computers and Learning. Making the connection. Paris: OECD Publishing.

[6] Sekretariat der ständigen Konferenz der Kultusminister der Länder in der BRD. 2008. „Menschenrechtsbildung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. Länderumfrage des Sekretariats zur Erstellung eines nationalen Berichts im Rahmen des Aktionsplans der Vereinten Nationen für das Weltprogramm zur Menschenrechtsbildung“. Bonn: Konferenz der Kultusminister der Länder in der BRD.

[7] Twigg, C. 2003. „Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: New Models for Online Learning“. Educ. Rev. 38 (Januar).

[8] Twigg, Carol A. 2013. „Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: Outcomes from Changing the Equation“. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 45 (4): 6–14.

Quo vadis UNESCO?

Quo vadis UNESCO?

Von Ulrike Zeigermann

Die UNESCO steht derzeit unter großem Druck. Seit 2009 bemüht sich die Organisation der Vereinten Nationen für Erziehung, Wissenschaft und Kultur um eine Reform. Doch statt versprochener größerer Sichtbarkeit und Wirksamkeit wird ihr von vielen Seiten vorgeworfen, zu politisch zu sein, auch steckt sie in finanziellen Schwierigkeiten. Im Oktober 2017 haben die USA und Israel zudem ihren Austritt erklärt. Vom 30. Oktober bis 14. November 2017 findet nun die Generalkonferenz der UNESCO statt, in der auch die Zukunft der Organisation neu verhandelt wird.

Viele offene Fragen bei der Generalversammlung 2017

Da Kriege im Geist der Menschen entstehen, muss auch der Frieden im Geist der Menschen verankert werden.“, heißt es in der Verfassung der UNESCO von 1945. Ein nobles Ziel, welches, so könnte man meinen, breite Zustimmung finden und vielfältiges politisches Engagement hervorbringen sollte. Verfolgt man jedoch die die aktuellen Debatten innerhalb der Organisation der Vereinten Nationen für Erziehung, Wissenschaft und Kultur (UNESCO), so scheint der Geist des Friedens zwischen den derzeit noch 195 Mitgliedsstaaten nicht besonders stark verankert ist.

Umso gespannter blicken zurzeit viele nach Paris, wo die Repräsentanten der Mitgliedstaaten vom 30. Oktober bis zum 14. November 2017 zusammen gekommen sind, um über die Zukunft dieser Sonderorganisation der Vereinten Nationen zu beraten. Seit 1946 finden die Sitzungen der Generalkonferenz alle zwei Jahre in Paris statt. Die Generalkonferenz ist das oberste Entscheidungs- und Kontrollorgan der UNESCO. Zur Diskussion stehen administrative Fragen zum Budget oder auch zur neuen Leitung der UNESCO. Daneben verhandelt die Generalkonferenz zwei Wochen lang jedoch auch viele inhaltliche Fragen. Und, in der Tat, offene Fragen gibt es viele.

In 2009 war erstmalig eine Frau an die Spitze der UNESCO gewählt worden. Bulgariens ehemalige Außenministerin Irina Bokova hat die Wahl mit einer Vision für sich entschieden, die eine grundlegende Reform der Organisation versprach. Trotz vieler erfolgreicher Programme in den letzten Jahren, insbesondere zur Förderung von nachhaltiger Entwicklung und von Frieden durch Bildung, steckt die UNESCO im Oktober 2017 – am Ende der Amtszeit von Irina Bokova – jedoch in einer tiefen Krise.

Bei der aktuellen Krise handelt es sich zunächst um eine finanzielle Krise. Die USA als wichtigster Beitragszahler der UNESCO zahlen bereits seit 2011 nicht mehr ins Budget ein, ebenso wenig Israel. Auch Japan als zweitwichtigster Beitragszahler hält seit 2015 immer wieder das Geld zurück und weitere Länder kommen hinzu. Insgesamt fehlt der UNESCO somit fast ein Drittel ihres Budgets. Die Schulden der Mitgliedstaaten betragen mittlerweile über 640 Mio. USD (Stand 3.11.2017). So überraschend sind diese Zahlen jedoch nicht.

Die finanziellen Probleme sind eng mit den jüngeren politischen Krisen verbunden. Der UNESCO wird vorgeworfen, zu politisch zu sein. Seit der Aufnahme des palästinensischen Autonomiegebietes als Vollmitglied 2011 kritisieren insbesondere Israel und die USA, die Organisation würde antiisraelische Entscheidungen treffen. Die Situation eskalierte 2016 nachdem in einer umstrittenen Resolution der Tempelberg in Ost-Jerusalem nur unter seinem muslimischen Namen aufgeführt und 2017 die Altstadt von Hebron im Westjordanland auf Antrag der Palästinenser auf die Weltkulturerbeliste gesetzt wurde. Am 12. Oktober 2017 erklärten die USA und Israel schließlich für Ende 2018 ihren Austritt aus der UNESCO. Beim Protest Japans wiederum geht es um die Aufnahme der Dokumente zum Nanjing Massaker von 1937 ins Weltdokumentenerbe, in das International Memory of the World Register. Auch andere Mitgliedstaaten, darunter Deutschland, werfen der Organisation immer wieder eine starke Politisierung vor.

Auch in der Vergangenheit haben immer wieder Staaten aus politischen Motiven die Organisation verlassen. So waren Südafrika von 1957 bis 1994, die U.S.A von 1985 bis 2003, Großbritannien und Nordirland von 1986 bis 1997 und Singapur von 1987 bis 2007 keine Mitgliedstaaten. Alle sind sie jedoch später wieder reguläre Mitgliedsstaaten geworden. Vielleicht ist es daher noch verfrüht, worst-case-Szenarios durchzuspielen. Dennoch von Frieden im Geist der Mitgliedstaaten kann aktuell keine Rede sein. Die UNESCO steht vor vielen Herausforderungen.

Die neue Generaldirektorin der UNESCO wurde offiziell am 10. November 2017 ernannt. Die frühere französische Ministerin Audrey Azoulay hatte sich zuvor im Exekutivrat gegen den katarischen Kandidaten Hamad bin Abdulasis al-Kawari mit 30 Stimmen zu 28 Stimmen durchgesetzt. Neben den akuten finanziellen Problemen und dem zentralen Vorwurf, einer zu großen Politisierung der Organisationen steht sie aber auch vor ganz konkreten strategischen und strukturellen Fragen, die auf der Generalkonferenz nur angerissen werden können.

Strategische Positionierung und inhaltliche Profilierung angesichts eines bröckelnden Multilateralismus

So wird ein zentraler (strategischer) Aspekt ihrer Arbeit die Positionierung der UNESCO innerhalb der Vereinten Nationen sein müssen. Letztlich muss sich die UNESCO auch innerhalb der Debatte um die Zukunft der internationalen (Staaten-)Gemeinschaft strategisch geschickt positionieren, will sie nicht, auch angesichts der kommenden finanziellen Engpässe, in der politischen Bedeutungslosigkeit versinken.

Auch wenn der Konflikt der USA mit der UNESCO schon seit der Aufnahme Palästinas 2011 besteht, erfolgte die Entscheidung zum Austritt dennoch in der Zeit des „America First“, in der U.S.-Präsident Donald Trump dem Pariser Abkommen zum Klimaschutz den Rücken gekehrt und die Vereinten Nationen immer wieder heftig kritisiert hat. Die Rhetorik eines geopolitischen Unilateralismus schwingt in den Polemiken Trumps immer wieder mit. Insofern ist die Entscheidung der USA, eine der wichtigsten politischen und wirtschaftlichen Nationen weltweit, vor allem auch von symbolischer Bedeutung. Die damalige Generaldirektorin Irina Bokova äußerte daher zurecht ihr Bedauern über die Entscheidung der USA und Israel, aus der UNESCO auszutreten: „Das ist ein Verlust für die UNESCO, aber auch für die gesamte Familie der Vereinten Nationen und für den Multilateralismus.“

Noch ist die UNESCO eine zentrale Sonderorganisation der Vereinten Nationen und die Generalsekretärin ist Mitglied des UN-Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB). Für die neue UNESCO-Generalsekretärin Audrey Azoulay wird es daher in ihrer Amtszeit nicht nur darum gehen, neues Vertrauen unter den Mitgliedstaaten zu schaffen, um ihre eigene Organisation aus der Krise zu holen, sondern die Vereinten Nationen insgesamt zu stärken und eine gemeinsame Zukunftsvision zu entwickeln, um ein Auseinanderbrechen der internationalen (Staaten-)Gemeinschaft zu verhindern.

Ganz konkret ist die UNESCO dabei mit Blick auf die Umsetzung der Agenda 2030 für Nachhaltige Entwicklung gefragt. Ziel und Aufgabe der UNESCO ist es, wechselseitiges Verständnis und Zusammenarbeit in Bildung, Wissenschaft und Kultur zur Wahrung des Friedens und der Sicherheit international zu fördern. Vor dem Hintergrund zahlreicher aktueller internationaler und innergesellschaftlicher Konflikte, die sich auch in den UNESCO-internen Problemen widerspiegeln, erscheint dieses Ziel heute dringender denn je. Umso bedeutsamer ist, dass am Rande der Generalkonferenz ein High-Level Ministertreffen zum vierten Ziel für nachhaltige Entwicklung (Bildung für nachhaltige Entwicklung, SDG 4) stattfindet, auf dem erste Erfahrungen bei der Umsetzung und weitere Meilensteine diskutiert werden. Durchaus ein politisches Minenfeld, denn  auch wenn 2015 die Ziele der Agenda 2030 von allen UN-Mitgliedstaaten einstimmig beschlossen wurden, so haben Staats- und Regierungschefs oftmals dennoch ganz eigene Vorstellungen von guter Bildungspolitik und lassen sich nur ungern in die Karten schauen. Für die UNESCO gilt es daher, mit diplomatischem Geschick zu agieren und sich dadurch sowohl strategisch als auch inhaltlich klar zu positionieren, denn Bildung gilt als Voraussetzung um weitere Menschenrechte verstehen, achten, wahrnehmen und einfordern zu können.

Professionalisierung und Überwindung von Strukturschwächen angesichts einer Renaissance nationaler politischer Interessen

Förderliche Bedingung für die starke Politisierung der UNESCO sind auch ihre eigenen Strukturen. Auf der Generalkonferenz wurden am 8. November 2017 neue Vertreter*innen der Mitgliedstaaten für die nächsten vier Jahre in das Exekutivkommittee gewählt. Das Exekutivkommittee wirkt als Aufsichtsorgan für die Arbeitsprogramme und prüft den Haushalt. Die Mitglieder dieses Gremiums sind nach festgelegter Quotierung in fünf Ländergruppen aufgeteilt. Auch Deutschland kandidierte 2017 wieder für einen Sitz in dem 58-köpfigen Exekutivkommittee. Es gehörte diesem bereits von 2013-2017 an. Anders als bei einem supranationalen Organ, wie beispielsweise der Europäischen Kommission, verfolgen die Vertreter*innen der Mitgliedstaaten im Exekutivkommittee hier jedoch vor allem staatliche Interessen und müssen sich primär gegenüber ihren nationalen Regierungen verantworten. Ihre politische Bedeutung für die internationale (Staaten-)Gemeinschaft wird die UNESCO jedoch nur öffentlich herausstellen können, wenn es ihr gelingt, die einzelnen nationalstaatlichen Interessen zusammen zu bringen, damit kohärente Arbeitsprogramme entwickelt und solide finanziert durchgeführt werden können.

Anderseits gilt es auch die Vorwürfe zur Politisierung insoweit zu entkräften, indem auf die inhärent politischen Aspekte einer (globalen) Bildungspolitik hingewiesen wird. Auch ein unabhängiges Mandat schützt am Ende nicht davor, dass auch überwiegend technische Aufgaben, wie die Frage um die Aufnahme der Dokumente zum Nanjing Massaker von 1937 ins Weltdokumentenerbe zeigen, politisch höchst brisant sein können. Der Wunsch nach einer unpolitischen internationalen Organisation ist insofern also unrealistisch und nicht angemessen. Als UN-Agentur orientiert sich die UNESCO vor allem an dem menschenrechtsbasierten Wertesystem der Vereinten Nationen. Dieses normative Wertesystem sollte Maßstab und Bezugspunkt der kritischen Diskussionen um die politischen Entscheidungsprozesse sein. Zumindest gilt es, diesen Maßstab und normativen Bezugspunkt fest im Arbeitsalltag der Organisation und ihrer Gremien sowie bei der Setzung von Prioritäten für Strategien zu verankern.

Die Herausforderung bei den aktuellen politischen Debatten während der Generalkonferenz, im neuen Exekutivkommittee und für die neue Generalsekretärin besteht also darin, in Zukunft entsprechende Entscheidungsprozesse transparenter aber auch inklusiver zu gestalten und damit gleichzeitig eine klare gemeinsame menschenrechtsbasierte und nachhaltige globale Bildungspolitik zur Umsetzung von SDG4 zu etablieren.

Dr. Ulrike Zeigermann

Dr. Ulrike Zeigermann ist Politikwissenschaftlerin mit den Forschungsschwerpunkten Menschenrechte und vergleichende Politikfeldanalyse an der Schnittstelle von Sicherheit und Entwicklung. Bevor sie an die Friedensakademie Rheinland-Pfalz kam, promovierte Ulrike Zeigermann an der Westfälischen Universität Münster und leitete am Centre Marc Bloch in Berlin die Forschungsgruppe „Staatliches Handeln und Wissenszirkulation“. Seit November 2017 ist sie wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Lehrstuhl für Politikwissenschaft mit Schwerpunkt Nachhaltige Entwicklung der Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg.

Klartext reden mit der Türkei

Klartext reden mit der Türkei

Von Gisela Müller-Brandeck-Bocquet

Derzeit fährt die EU mit der immer autokratischer auftretenden Regierung Erdogans keinen klaren, überzeugenden Kurs. Dabei wäre es gerade jetzt wichtig, dass sie Rückgrat zeigt und sich wegen des Flüchtlingsabkommens nicht auf Abstriche an ihren demokratischen Werten einlässt. 

Das europäisch-türkische Verhältnis: Eine schwierige Geschichte

Die Beziehungen zwischen der EU und der Türkei waren schon immer äußerst schwierig. Das 1963 geschlossene Assoziierungsabkommen blieb wegen der Militärputsche in der Türkei (1960, 1971, 1980, 1997) ein prekäres Projekt und als 2005 Beitrittsverhandlungen mit der Türkei aufgenommen wurden, waren dem tiefe innereuropäische Auseinandersetzungen vorausgegangen. Schließlich hatten sich diejenigen Kräfte durchgesetzt, die den damaligen Demokratisierungskurs der Türkei unter Recep Tayyip Erdogan befördern und konsolidieren wollten. Bereits Ende 2006 jedoch wurden die Verhandlungen teilweise ausgesetzt; seither dümpelten sie ein Jahrzehnt lang vor sich hin.

Doch als die EU am 18. März 2016 mit der Türkei ein Abkommen zur Bewältigung des Flüchtlingszustroms schloss, beinhaltete dieser Deal, dass die Beitrittsverhandlungen wiederbelebt und mit neuem Elan vorangetrieben werden sollten. Inwieweit beide Seiten ernsthaft an dieses Vorhaben glaubten, muss offen bleiben. Höchstwahrscheinlich ist der inzwischen zum autokratischen Staatpräsidenten gewandelte Erdogan gar nicht mehr ernsthaft an einem EU-Beitritt der Türkei interessiert; und wie die von Polykrisen geschüttelte EU einen solchen verkraften könnte, steht eh in den Sternen. So war der Beschluss zur Intensivierung der Beitrittsverhandlungen beiderseits wohl vorrangig ein symbolischer Akt.

 Eine zerstrittene EU

Dennoch kam es in der EU in den letzten Wochen zu heftigen Schlagabtauschen über den Umgang mit der Türkei. Die Frage lautet, ob man angesichts der brutalen Repression, mit der das Erdogan-Regime auf den gescheiterten Putschversuch vom 15. Juli 2016 reagiert, noch Beitrittsverhandlungen mit Ankara führen kann und darf. Denn mit mehr als 100.000 vom Dienst suspendierten Staatsdienern und rund 40.000 Verhafteten sowie mit massiven Angriffen auf die Presse- und Meinungsfreiheit sind die türkische Demokratie und Rechtstaatlichkeit ernsthaft in Gefahr.

Am 24. November 2016 hat daher das Europäische Parlament mit großer Mehrheit (479 gegen 37 Stimmen bei 107 Enthaltungen) dafür gestimmt, die Verhandlungen mit der Türkei einzufrieren, d.h. „weder über offene Verhandlungskapitel mit Ankara zu sprechen noch neue Kapitel zu eröffnen“ (Zeit-online, 25.11.2016). Die EU-Parlamentarier betonten, dass es sich um eine zeitlich begrenzte Forderung handele, die bei Rückkehr der Türkei zu voller Rechtstaatlichkeit wieder aufgehoben werden könnte. Diese Resolution ist rechtlich nicht bindend, erregte aber dennoch heftigen Ärger in der Türkei.

Als der Rat der Außenminister am 13. Dezember 2016 über das Thema beriet, konnte kein Beschluss gefasst werden. Die erforderliche Einstimmigkeit ließ sich nicht erzielen, weil Österreichs Außenminister Sebastian Kurz (ÖVP) sich hinter die Entschließung des Europäischen Parlaments stellte und das Einfrieren der Verhandlungen forderte. „Es geht überhaupt nicht darum, Türen zuzuschlagen oder nicht mehr im Gespräch zu bleiben“, wird Kurz zitiert, sondern darum „ein politisches Symbol zu setzten und der Türkei nicht weiter vorzugaukeln, dass der Beitritt in die EU bald möglich sei“ (Süddeutsche Zeitung, 13.12.2016). Doch konnte sich Kurz mit dieser couragierten Haltung im Kreise seiner Kollegen nicht durchsetzen. Vielmehr hielt die slowakische Ratspräsidentschaft in einer nicht bindenden Erklärung der Außenminister fest, dass unter den gegebenen Umständen zwar keine neuen Verhandlungskapitel eröffnet werden sollen, den Prozess an sich wollte man aber nicht einfrieren. Explizit wird die EU-Türkei-Kooperation in der Flüchtlingsfrage als erfolgreich gelobt – die Abhängigkeit von der Türkei bei diesem Problem dürfte de facto entscheidend für den sehr moderaten Ton der Erklärung sein. Gleichwohl äußern die Minister mehrfach ihre ernsthafte Sorge um die Rechtstaatlichkeit der Türkei.

Die Befürworter dieser konzilianten Haltung – darunter auch Außenminister Frank-Walter Steinmeier – betonten, sie wollten den Dialog mit Ankara aufrechterhalten, auch um Einfluss ausüben zu können. Zudem unterstütze auch die türkische Opposition diesen Kurs vehement. Außenminister Kurz, der den positiven Einfluss der EU auf Erdogan in Zweifel stellte, wurde scharf kritisiert; Michael Roth, Staatsminister im Auswärtigen Amt, geißelte Österreichs Kompromisslosigkeit als „sehr enttäuschend“ (Süddeutsche Zeitung, 13.12.2016). So wird der einzige EU-Außenminister, der angesichts der prekären Lage in der Türkei mit Ankara Klartext reden will, bezichtigt, die Union zu spalten.

Vor diesem Hintergrund wirken die jüngsten Pläne der Kommission geradezu gewissenlos und rückgratlos; denn sie will die Wirtschaftsbeziehungen und die Zollunion mit der Türkei ausbauen. Dabei betonte die Kommission, diese Pläne seien „unabhängig von der aktuellen Entwicklung der Beziehungen zu sehen“ (Süddeutsche Zeitung, 21.12.2016).

Aber hallo, muss man da rufen, geht’s noch? Kann man noch instinktloser sein, noch opportunistischer? In ihrem „Fortschrittsbericht Türkei“ vom 9. November 2016 wirft die Kommission dem Land Rückschritte bei der Unabhängigkeit der Justiz und der Meinungsfreiheit vor und sieht insgesamt deutlich verschlechterte Chancen für den Beitritt. „Die Türkei hat sich offenbar entschieden, sich von Europa weg zu bewegen“, meinte Johannes Hahn, EU-Kommissar für Nachbarschaftspolitik und Erweiterung bei der Vorstellung des Berichts (Zeit-online, 9.11.2016).

Wie kann da die sich politisch verstehende Juncker- Kommission eine mit überwältigender Mehrheit beschlossene Resolution des Europäischen Parlaments, dieses Gewissens Europas, so respektlos übergehen? Wie kann sie die Erklärung der amtierenden slowakischen Präsidentschaft desavouieren, die doch noch vor einigen Tagen das Nicht-Eröffnen neuer Verhandlungskapitel festgehalten hat und damit immerhin in die „richtige Richtung“ wies, wie der Abweichler Sebastian Kurz anerkannte? Wie kann all das sein?

Keine Verhandlungen mit einer autoritären Türkei

Erdogan plant derzeit einen fundamentalen Umbau des türkischen politischen Systems, das künftig den Staatpräsidenten mit sehr weitreichenden Befugnissen ausstatten soll. Die Regierung wäre dann nicht mehr dem Parlament, sondern dem Präsidenten verantwortlich, der zugleich auch Oberbefehlshaber der Streitkräfte würde. Ein entsprechendes Referendum ist für März 2017 angedacht (Süddeutsche Zeitung, 09.01./10.01.2017). Außerdem hat Erdogan mehrfach eine Parlamentsabstimmung über die Wiedereinführung der Todesstrafe in Aussicht gestellt. Sollte es dazu kommen, ist ein EU-Beitritt definitiv ausgeschlossen.

Daher wäre es eine vernünftige und verantwortungsvolle Lösung, wenn Kommission und Rat – warum nicht auch der Europäische Rat als die Versammlung der Staats- und Regierungschefs der EU? – sich dem Votum des Europäischen Parlaments anschließen würden. Sie sollten beschließen: Wir, die Europäische Union, setzen Verhandlungen mit der Türkei solange aus, bis Referendum und Parlamentsabstimmung erfolgt sind und somit der künftige Kurs der Türkei erkennbar wird. Diese Zeit nutzen wir, die EU, um vertieft darüber zu debattieren, ob wir in absehbarer Zeit einen Beitritt der Türkei überhaupt noch anstreben. Und wir schaffen neue, alternative und innovative Modalitäten, um Drittstaaten, die nicht EU-Mitglieder sind, partnerschaftlich und verlässlich mit uns zu verbinden – über solche neuen Modelle müssen wir angesichts des bevorstehenden Brexit ohnehin sehr intensiv nachdenken.

Gisella Müller-Brandeck-Bocquet

Prof. Dr. Gisela Müller-Brandeck-Bocquet ist Professorin für Europaforschung und Internationale Beziehungen an der Universität Würzburg.

 

Happy-End in Kolumbien? Warum jetzt die schwierigste Phase des Friedensprozesses beginnt

Happy-End in Kolumbien? Warum jetzt die schwierigste Phase des Friedensprozesses beginnt

Von Thomas Keil

Nach dem überraschenden „Nein“ der Kolumbianer_innen zum Friedensabkommen mit der FARC im Oktober, ist es der kolumbianischen Regierung nun gelungen einen neuen Friedensvertrag auszuhandeln und zu verabschieden. Nach 52 Jahren bewaffnetem Konflikt scheint der Frieden damit nun endlich in greifbarer Nähe. Allerdings markiert die Verabschiedung des Friedensvertrages keineswegs das Ende des kolumbianischen Friedensprozesses. Vielmehr stellen seine Umsetzung und die Transformation der Konfliktursachen die kolumbianische Gesellschaft vor große Herausforderungen. Es ist wichtig, dass die internationale Gemeinschaft ihre Aufmerksamkeit nun nicht von Kolumbien abwendet.

Die fast unendliche Geschichte: Einigung und Verabschiedung des Friedensabkommens

Für alle Befürworter_innen des Friedensvertrags in Kolumbien brachte der 13. Dezember eine gute Nachricht: Das Verfassungsgericht befand, dass die Verabschiedung des revidierten Abkommens zwischen Regierung und FARC-Guerilla durch den Kongress gültig ist. Nicht minder wichtig ist, dass auch der so genannte „Fast-Track“-Mechanismus intakt gelassen wurde, der es zulässt, Gesetzesvorhaben und Verfassungsänderungen zur Umsetzung des Friedensvertrags, in beschleunigtem Verfahren durch das Parlament zu bringen. Damit sind die notwendigen Voraussetzungen gegeben, um nun zügig die dringendsten Komponenten für die beginnende Umsetzung der Vereinbarungen bereitzustellen – vor allem das Amnestiegesetz und die Sonderjustiz für den Frieden. Diese sind vor allem wichtig, um Erwartungssicherheit aufseiten der FARC zu schaffen, die sich in den kommenden sechs Monaten sammeln und entwaffnen sollen.

Das langwierige Kapitel der Aushandlung und Verabschiedung eines Friedensabkommens im Thriller namens „kolumbianischer Friedensprozess“ konnte also endlich abgeschlossen werden. Ein nicht zu unterschätzender Erfolg, wenn man sich die Ereignisse der vergangenen Monate ins Gedächtnis ruft: Nach der feierlichen Unterzeichnung des Abkommens in Cartagena am 26. September wiesen die Kolumbianer_innen den historischen Vertrag knapp eine Woche später mit einer hauchdünnen Mehrheit in einer Volksabstimmung zurück. Damit war das Ergebnis von etwa vier Jahren Verhandlungen vorerst delegitimiert. Auf eine kurze Schockstarre folgten große, vor allem von Studierenden initiierte, Demonstrationen für den Frieden und die Ankündigung aus Norwegen, dass Präsident Santos den diesjährigen Friedensnobelpreis erhalten solle. Die Abfolge der Ereignisse war derart schnell und verwirrend, dass haufenweise Vergleiche mit dem magischen Realismus Gabriel García Marquez‘ gezogen wurden.

In der Folge bemühten sich die Verhandlungsteams und die Regierung Santos, im Dialog vor allem mit den diversen Stimmen der „NO“-Kampagne, Vorschläge zu sammeln und in die Nachverhandlungen einzubringen. Bereits am 12. November konnte ein neues Abkommen vorgestellt werden, das zwar in Struktur und Inhalt dem ersten folgt, aber dennoch einige durchaus wichtige Präzisierungen und Änderungen enthält (mehr Infos): So wird das neue Abkommen keinen Verfassungsrang mehr erhalten, die Freiheitsbeschränkungen im Rahmen der Urteile der Sonderjustiz wurden deutlich präzisiert und Delikte von FARC-Mitgliedern im Zusammenhang mit dem Drogenhandel werden nun nicht mehr pauschal amnestiert. Kaum Änderungen gab es hingegen beim Thema der politischen Partizipation: Ex-Guerilleros sollen im Rahmen der Sonderjustiz nicht ihre politischen Rechte verlieren und der FARC-Nachfolgepartei werden weiterhin fünf Sitze pro Parlamentskammer für zwei Wahlperioden garantiert. Die Hoffnung, durch die Nachverhandlungen einen breiten nationalen Konsens zu erreichen, erfüllte sich allerdings nicht. Die prominenten Köpfe des „Nein“ änderten ihre Meinung nicht und so bleibt die politische Polarisierung auch mit dem revidierten Abkommen hoch.

Das neue Kapitel: Herausforderungen und Gefahren der Umsetzung

Wie sind nun die Perspektiven für den nächsten Teil der kolumbianischen Friedensgeschichte, die Umsetzung des Abkommens? In seiner Rede zur Verleihung des Nobelpreises sagte Präsident Juan Manuel Santos, nun sei ganz Amerika eine Zone des Friedens. Doch diese Behauptung ist etwas voreilig: Damit in Kolumbien tatsächlich Frieden geschaffen werden kann, kommt es wesentlich darauf an, wie gut die Friedensvereinbarungen und die dort enthaltenen Reformen umgesetzt werden können. Diese Ansicht wird auch aus der Friedens- und Konfliktforschung gestützt. In diesem Zusammenhang stellen mehrere Faktoren eine Gefahr dar.

Zum ersten handelt es sich bekanntermaßen um ein Abkommen zwischen Regierung und FARC. Es bietet die Aussicht, die mit Abstand wichtigste Guerillaorganisation des Landes in einen legalen politischen Akteur umzuwandeln. Die geplanten formalen Verhandlungen mit der kleineren „Nationalen Befreiungsarmee“ (ELN) stehen allerdings weiterhin aus. Zudem gibt es weitere illegale bewaffnete Akteure, unter denen sich die Überreste früher teilweise demobilisierter Guerillas, Nachfolger der Paramilitärs und Banden finden. Auch aufseiten der FARC haben sich kleinere Splittergruppen gebildet, die sich nicht demobilisieren wollen. Die genannten Akteure sorgen in den von ihnen besetzten, meist marginalisierten Gebieten des Landes weiterhin für Unsicherheit oder befinden sich in zuvor FARC-kontrollierten Territorien in einem beginnenden gewaltsamen Wettbewerb um die „Nachfolge“ der Hoheit über illegale Ökonomien. Diese Existenz von bewaffneten „Störenfrieden“ (spoilers) ist ein gravierendes Hindernis für die Umsetzungsphase und damit für die Schaffung dauerhaften Friedens. Der Hohe Menschenrechtskommissar der Vereinten Nationen im Land äußerte sich jüngst sehr besorgt über diese Problematik und über die bereits 52 politisch motivierten Morde im Jahr 2016.

Ein zweites Problem sind die wirtschaftlichen Perspektiven Kolumbiens. Die (Rohstoff-)Exporte schwächeln und das Wachstum des Landes lag zwischen Mai und August diesen Jahres bei nur zwei Prozent, der schlechteste Wert seit sieben Jahren. Staatliche Institutionen kämpfen mit rückläufigen Budgets und es ist fraglich, inwiefern die geplante Steuerreform die Staatseinnahmen stärken kann. In der revidierten Version des Friedensvertrags wird zudem betont, dass die Umsetzung die fiskalische Nachhaltigkeit nicht infrage stellen dürfe. Während in der Forschung Belege für die Bedeutung einer guten wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung für die „Haltbarkeit“ von Friedensabkommen angeführt werden, sind die diesbezüglichen Aussichten momentan recht trüb.

Ein dritter Faktor ist die bereits erwähnte starke politische Polarisierung im Land. Dass diese nachlässt, ist unwahrscheinlich, zumal im Frühjahr 2018 die nächsten Präsidentschaftswahlen anstehen. Dies dürfte 2017 zu vermehrter Unruhe innerhalb der heterogenen Regierungskoalition führen. In Teilen der linken Opposition gibt es derweil eine intensive Debatte darüber, ob man mit der Perspektive einer möglichst breiten Koalition für den Frieden in die Vorwahlperiode geht oder lieber einen scharfen Oppositionskurs gegenüber der amtierenden Mitte-Rechts-Regierung fährt. Mit Blick auf die Nachhaltigkeit des Friedensprozesses erscheint erstere Option geboten, vor allem da die rechten und ultrakonservativen Kräfte ihre große Mobilisierungsfähigkeit bei der Volksabstimmung unter Beweis gestellt haben. Selbst mit einer breiten Allianz der Unterstützer_innen des Friedensabkommens besteht die Gefahr, dass der oder die nächste Präsident_in den Friedensprozess kaum unterstützt oder sogar ablehnt – mit schweren Folgen für dessen Umsetzung. Eine schwere Hypothek in diesem Zusammenhang ist die Ablehnung des ersten Friedensvertrags an den Wahlurnen und die Verabschiedung des revidierten Abkommens durch den Kongress. Dies bietet eine hervorragende Angriffsfläche für die Gegner_innen des Prozesses, die so leicht die Legitimität des Abkommens infrage stellen können.

Fazit

Die Einigung auf ein neues Abkommen mit den FARC und dessen Verabschiedung bieten die Chance, dem Ziel eines nachhaltigen Friedens in Kolumbien sehr viel näher zu kommen. Dies erfordert eine konsequente Umsetzung der (Re-)Integration der FARC als Ganzes in das politische Leben auf der einen Seite sowie die sozio-ökonomische Wiedereingliederung ihrer Mitglieder auf der anderen Seite. Es erfordert effektiven Schutz für die Demobilisierten aber auch für Aktivist_innen und Menschenrechtsverteidiger_innen. Um Frieden dauerhaft zu verwirklichen bedarf es des Weiteren einer verbesserten Beteiligung am politischen Prozess, einer effektiven Übergangsjustiz sowie Wiedergutmachung für die Opfer des gewaltsamen Konflikts. Schließlich bedarf es umfangreicher Wirtschaftsreformen, die der Friedensvertrag vor allem mit Blick auf ländliche Ökonomien vorsieht. Nun sind die kolumbianische Politik und Zivilgesellschaft gefragt, die Umsetzung des Friedensvertrages aktiv einzufordern und zu begleiten. Breite und effektive Allianzen für den Friedensprozess sind dafür von großer Bedeutung. Die internationale Gemeinschaft sollte währenddessen ihre Unterstützung für den Frieden und die Bündnisse, von denen er getragen wird, mindestens genauso stark wie bis jetzt unter Beweis stellen. Unter diesen Voraussetzungen kann die scheinbar unendliche Geschichte des kolumbianischen Friedensprozesses zu einem erfolgreichen Ende geschrieben werden.

Thomas Keil

Thomas Keil ist Projektassistent bei der Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung und arbeitet im Büro der Stiftung in Bogotá, Kolumbien. Zuvor studierte er Verwaltungswissenschaften und Politikwissenschaften in Münster, Twente und an der Freien Universität Berlin.