Archiv der Kategorie: Gender

Negating the existence of female combatants hurts women’s status in peace processes

Negating the existence of female combatants hurts women’s status in peace processes

By Emanuel Hermann

 The gender-essentialist assumption that women are only involved in armed conflict as civilians and victims, never as combatants and perpetrators, leads to their exclusion from economic opportunities that are awarded to potential spoilers of peace. In Sierra Leone, where women constituted a large part of the armed groups, the Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration-program provides a salient example for this.

 

Women were labelled the “worst losers” of Sierra Leone’s eleven years long civil war.[1] News articles, reports by international organisations and academics predominately depicted women as victims and highlighted their vulnerability in the conflict. Although a large percentage of fighters were actually women, their role as perpetrators of violence was largely ignored. Most international organisations refused to refer to former female combatants as “fighters” and instead termed them “women associated with armed groups” or “dependents”. This discourse deprived women of agency during and after the conflict and influenced the programs offered to women in the post-conflict phase by international organisations.

The role of female combatants in the Sierra Leonean conflict

Approximately 75,000 people were killed in the civil war in Sierra Leone between 1991 until 2002. The conflict was characterised by various factions fighting each other and the government respectively. All conflict parties were responsible for atrocities and all factions had female combatants in their ranks. In total, it was estimated that around 10-30% of all fighters were women and girls.[2] It is impossible to make generalisations about the experiences of women and girls during the war since they varied considerably among individuals. Some tried to escape the groups they were to become a part of, some married fellow combatants out of love, some were forced to do so, some divorced, some had children, and some took up the opportunity to join the fight.[3] Only a minority of women decided to join the groups by choice. Most of them were abducted (as were many men and boys) and subsequently suffered sexual abuse and forced labour within their respective armed group.[4]

For those women who decided to take up arms it is important to point out that they did not do so primarily to improve their own or women’s status more generally. Instead, many chose to fight for their own or families’ survival. Their decisions were constrained by the social context they found themselves in. Their options were often very limited, consisting of either taking up arms, becoming the lover of a commander, having to work in the camps or being killed by fellow group members. Choosing between life and death is of course “more a matter of bare survival” than a choice.[5] However, although highly constrained in their choice, women in the camps could decide between different survival strategies. Some women who decided to fight, stated that this enabled them to access resources through looting, to protect themselves against the enemy but also against members of their own armed groups. Some stated that possessing a gun made them “feel strong and fearless”.[6] Thus, becoming a combatant enabled some women to have a certain degree of independence and agency. However, conditions for female combatants still differed strongly from those of their male counterparts. They remained more vulnerable to sexual violence and forced labour were relatively powerless within the armed groups.[7]

The DDR-process and the influence of gender essentialist ideas

Sierra Leone’s civil war was followed by a massive peacebuilding and subsequent statebuilding project. As in other post-conflict countries, Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) was a major component of this processes. DDR-programs are generally based on the assumption that former members of armed groups are “potential spoilers to the peace process and therefore pose a danger in a post-conflict environment”.[8] A crucial element of DDR-processes is the disarming of groups. Demobilisation refers to the process of “decommissioning active combatants from Armed Forces and other armed groups”. [9] Reintegration aims at giving combatants economic opportunities either by returning to civilian life or, in some cases, by integrating into the national army. In the case of Sierra Leone, the DDR-process was mainly funded by the World Bank, the United Nations Mission to Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL), UNICEF and the Sierra Leonean government. At first, the program was supposed to “support the short term economic and social integration” of around 45,000 former combatants of all factions. The actual number of former fighters turned out to be much higher and when the program ended in 2002, around 75,000 people had taken part in the process.[10]

The planning and execution of the DDR-process in Sierra Leone was based on the gendered assumption of men as “perpetrators” in war and women as “victims” of war.[11] In general, this dichotomy is predominant within the international policy community. In the case of Sierra Leone, women combatants were portrayed as “camp followers”, “sex-slaves” and “wives” but not as “fighters” or “combatants” although some were exactly that. In contrast, men associated with armed groups, were exclusively defined as soldiers but never as “men involved in armed groups” or similar terms that were used to describe former female fighters. Since most women were first abducted and usually raped, they were seen solely as “victims”. That a person can be both, a “victim” but also a “perpetrator”, is not considered in this discourse. This oversimplification had serious consequences in Sierra Leone where it led to the different treatment of male and female combatants within the DDR-process, especially in the reintegration phase. Women were not seen as “real soldiers” and hence, not as a potential security threat to the peace. As MacKenzie highlights, DDR-process are essentially “securitisation”-processes in which potential threats are constructed and policies designed to produce security. Thus, not being recognised as a threat can have serious policy implications.[12] In Sierra Leone, it led to the “depoliticization” of women’s role in the conflict and since in a post-conflict climate the international community is more likely to prioritise perceived security threats, reintegration efforts for male combatants received considerably more attention and funding. Reintegration programs for men encompassed a range of different training programs to prepare them for a legal occupation while reintegration for women was largely seen as “a social process” in which women were expected to return to their communities to start a “normal” life.[13] Furthermore, the training options for women were very limited and based upon gender-essentialist ideas of the role of women in the economy. While the training programs for men included potentially lucrative skills like auto mechanics, computer skills or masonry and plumbing, the options for women were limited and consisted of low-income activities such as soap-making, tie-dying or tailoring. Another part of the program that should help female women to return to their communities encompassed a micro-credit scheme that was designed to help women to “reduce the family pressure on male ex-combatants”.[14] Again, it was assumed that women want to act in the way that is expected of them, which is to be married, stay married and support their breadwinning husband.

Conclusion

The programs implemented by international organisations in post-conflict Sierra Leone were based on gender essentialist ideas about women’s role in conflict and society. By describing female combatants solely as “victims”, they were assigned a fixed personal status rather than acknowledging that female combatants were also perpetrators of violence. This categorisation determined their perceived importance in the peace process as well as the economic options offered to them. While former male combatants were viewed as a potential threat to stability that needed to be managed by providing them with economic opportunities, women’s reintegration was understood as a social process. They were assumed to return to their previous place in society depriving them from the positions of authority or economic opportunities some of them had known during the civil war. The post-conflict period can be a source of social change and an opportunity for the political and economic inclusion of previously marginalised groups. In the case of Sierra Leone, however, this did not happen as peace builders deprived women of agency and instead reinforced stereotypical gender views.

Emanuel Hermann

Emanuel Hermann studiert Development Studies mit dem Schwerpunkt “Conflict, Power and Development” am Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Genf. Er ist zudem als studentischer Mitarbeiter an der Friedensakademie Rheinland-Pfalz angestellt und arbeitete mehrere Jahre für das Heidelberger Institut für Internationale Konfliktforschung (HIIK).

 

Quellen

[1] MacKenzie, Megan (2009a) Securitization and Desecuritization: Female Soldiers and the Reconstruction of Women in Post-Conflict Sierra Leone, Security Studies 18:2, 241-261.

[2] Coulter, Chris (2008) Female Fighters in the Sierra Leone War: Challenging the Assumptions?, Feminist Review 88:1, 54-73.

[3] MacKenzie, Megan (2009b) Empowerment boom or bust? Assessing women’s post-conflict empowerment initiatives, Cambridge Review of International Affairs 22:2, 199-215; MacKenzie, Securitization and Desecuritization; Coulter, Female Fighters in the Sierra Leone War; Lahai, John Idriss (2012) ‘Fused in Combat’: Unsettling Gender Hierarchies and Women’s Roles in the Fighting Forces in Sierra Leone’s Civil War, ARAS 33:1, 34-55.

[4] Coulter, Female Fighters in the Sierra Leone War, p.58/59. It is difficult to determine the number of female combatants who joint armed groups voluntarily. About 93% of women who served in the Revolutionary United Front (RUF), the armed group with the highest number of female combatants, stated that they were abducted and forcefully recruited (Cohen, Dara Kay (2013) Female Combatants and the Perpetration of Violence: Wartime Rape in the Sierra Leonean Civil War, World Politics 65:3, 383-415, p.402).

[5] Coulter, Female Fighters in the Sierra Leone War, p.68.

[6] ibid., p.68.

[7] ibid., p.68. Rape and other sexual violence was also committed against boys and men, though on a much smaller scale (see: Human Rights Watch (2003) ‘We will kill you if you cry’: Sexual Violence in the Sierra Leonean Conflict, https://www.hrw.org/reports/2003/sierraleone/index.htm#TopOfPage [13.02.2019]).

[8] Thakur, Monika (2008) Demilitarising Militias in the Kivus (eastern Democratic Republic of Congo), African Security Studies 17:1, 51-67, p.53; for more on DDR-processes see Omach, Paul (2012) The Limits of Disarmament, Demobilisation, and Reintegration, in: Peacebuilding, Power, and Politics in Africa. Ed. by Devon Curtis & Gwinyayi A. Dzinesa, Ohio: Ohio University Press.

[9] Carames, Albert & Eneko Sanz (2009) DDR 2009: Analysis of Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR) Programmes in the World during 2008. Bellaterra: School for a Culture of Peace, p.8.

[10] MacKenzie, Empowerment boom or bust?, p.207.

[11] Coulter, Female Fighters in the Sierra Leone War, p.65/66.

[12] MacKenzie, Securitization and Desecuritization, p.245 & p.257.

[13] ibid., p.257.

[14] MacKenzie, Empowerment boom or bust?, p.208-213.

 

Der Mädchen-Effekt: Eine Kritik am vorherrschenden Frauenbild in der Entwicklungshilfe

Der Mädchen-Effekt: Eine Kritik am vorherrschenden Frauenbild in der Entwicklungshilfe

Von Max Jansen

Mit den Erfolgen der Frauenbewegung hat sich im öffentlichen Diskurs ein Frauenbild etabliert, das die Eingliederung von Frauen in globale Wertschöpfungsketten in den Vordergrund stellt. Diese Vorstellung, in der Frauen vor allem eine gesamtgesellschaftliche Investition sind, dominiert heute auch die transnationale Entwicklungszusammenarbeit. Das ihr zugrundeliegende Frauenbild ist eindimensional und unpolitisch. Verfolgt Entwicklungszusammenarbeit das Ziel, Frauen und Mädchen wirklich zu ermächtigen, muss sie einem politischen Selbstverständnis folgen.

Feministische Kämpfe haben Frauen in den vergangenen 100 Jahren zu weitreichender rechtlicher Gleichberechtigung und zunehmender wirtschaftlicher, politischer und kultureller Teilhabe verholfen. In Verbindung damit hat sich in den letzten Jahrzehnten medial und kulturell ein neues Frauenbild etabliert, das Frauen nicht länger als benachteiligt und unterdrückt, sondern vielmehr als dynamisch, kompetent, sozial und erfolgreich darstellt. Insbesondere jungen Frauen wird heute in öffentlichen Debatten mit Faszination, Enthusiasmus und lustvoller Aufregung begegnet. Dabei haben sich innerhalb des Feminismus mittlerweile vor allem solche Strömungen durchgesetzt, deren Schwerpunkt auf der ungehinderten Teilnahme von Frauen am Arbeitsmarkt liegt. Dieser, häufig als „liberaler Feminismus“ betitelte Feminismus, prägt derzeit auch das Frauenbild, welches in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit von Staaten, Stiftungen, Nichtregierungsorganisationen (NGOs) und Unternehmen des globalen Nordens vermittelt wird.

The Girl Effect: Mädchen als perfekte Empfängerinnen von Entwicklungshilfe

Durch die entwicklungspolitischen Programme staatlicher Entwicklungsagenturen, internationaler Organisationen und die Werbeanzeigen westlicher NGOs zieht sich heute die Idee der sogenannten „girlpower“ – einer Frauen und Mädchen eigenen Macht. So lautet der Titel eines Berichtes des global tätigen Finanzdienstleisters Goldman Sachs beispielsweise „Women Hold Up Half the Sky“, während der internationale Wirtschaftsfond titelt “Girl Power – Policies that help integrate women into the workforce benefit everyone”. In der von der Nike Foundation getragenen Kampagne „The Girl Effect“ heißt es „change starts with a girl“, denn Mädchen seien die „mächtigste Kraft für den Wandel auf unserem Planeten“. Auch die Kinderhilfsorganisation Plan International spricht in „An alle Frauen in Deutschland“ adressierten Briefen von einem „Mädchen-Effekt“, der dadurch wirke, dass private Spenden von Einzelpersonen im globalen Norden jungen Mädchen im globalen Süden Bildungsangebote ermöglichen. Diese Bildungsangebote sollen dazu führen, dass Mädchen zunächst ihr eigenes Leben und in der Konsequenz auch die Gesellschaften, in denen sie leben, positiv verändern.

Kurzum, Frauen werden von Geberorganisationen der Entwicklungshilfe nicht mehr primär in einer Opferrolle, als hilfsbedürftige „third world women“ dargestellt, sondern als Ikonen der Effizienz und des Altruismus – und nicht zuletzt, als ertragreiches Investment. Während Jungen und Männer aus dem globalen Süden durch das Bild des potenziell gefährlichen „Flüchtlings“ zunehmend als Problem dargestellt werden, erscheinen Frauen und Mädchen als kooperationswillige und kompetente Partnerinnen beim Aufbau der (besseren) Welt von morgen.

 Kompetent und unpolitisch

Derartige Kampagnen sprechen, einer (neo-)liberalen Logik folgend, gezielt Vorstellungen von persönlicher Ermächtigung (Empowerment) und individueller Handlungsfähigkeit (Agency) an. Sie rücken ökonomische Aktivitäten in den Vordergrund und sind darum bemüht, junge Frauen und Mädchen im globalen Süden fest in bereits bestehende Formen globaler Wertschöpfung einzugliedern. Die wirtschaftlichen und sozialen Erträge, die eine Gesellschaft aus der Investition in Frauen und Mädchen erhält, hängen in dieser Sichtweise von deren optimistischer Einstellung und Strebsamkeit ab – kurzum, von Vorstellungen tugendhafter Weiblichkeit. Damit bürden sie individuellen Frauen und Mädchen die Verantwortung auf, die Gesellschaften, in denen sie leben, in ein neues Zeitalter zu führen. Politische Auseinandersetzungen über die Notwendigkeit struktureller Veränderungen rücken so an den Rand der Bedeutungslosigkeit.

So dargestellt erscheinen globale Ungerechtigkeiten durch geschickte Ressourcenausstattung auf individueller Ebene lösbar, während die Notwendigkeit grundlegender gesellschaftlicher Veränderungen in den Hintergrund tritt. Aufgrund der ihnen zugeschriebenen Potenziale erscheinen insbesondere junge Mädchen im globalen Süden als eine vermeintlich feministische Lösung für die derzeitigen Entwicklungsprobleme der Welt (und zunehmend auch des Klimawandels). Auf diese Weise wird eine warenförmige Weiblichkeit produziert: Frauen werden als durchweg freundlich, schön und gewissermaßen formbar dargestellt. Sie strahlen Wohlwollen, Strebsamkeit und einen guten Willen aus, wodurch sie als attraktive Vorbotinnen eines neuen weiblichen Typs erscheinen. Das erfolgreiche Mädchen entsteht hierbei erst durch einen von außen auszulösenden Effekt, der an konkrete Erwartungen geknüpft wird. Die Aufgabe, eine positive Veränderung der Welt herbeizuführen, wird somit ausgerechnet von denjenigen geschultert, die unter den derzeitigen globalen Verhältnissen am meisten leiden.

Ausblick: Die Frau in Jinwar und die Notwendigkeit struktureller Veränderungen

Während mittels dieses Frauenbildes eine mögliche Verbesserung der Welt suggeriert wird, die ohne eine Analyse und Beseitigung der strukturellen Grundlagen der bestehenden Missstände auszukommen scheint, zeigen andere Beispiele, dass ein transnationales Engagement für Frauen und Mädchen auch anders möglich ist. Beispielhaft lässt sich dies anhand des Frauenbildes beschreiben, das in der Außendarstellung des Frauendorfes Jinwar in Nordsyrien zum Tragen kommt. Das Frauendorf wurde durch ein Komitee von Dorfbewohnerinnen im Norden der Demokratischen Föderation Nordsyrien, besser bekannt unter ihrem kurdischen Namen „Rojava“, ins Leben gerufen und wird von der Konföderation der Frauenbewegung in Rojava in Kooperation mit der Stiftung der Freien Frau in Rojava/Syrien unterstützt. Das Leitmotto des Frauendorfes lautet: „Die freie Frau ist die Basis der freien Gesellschaft“. Also dient die Frau auch in Jinwar zur Verkörperung eines bevorstehenden Wandels, der weit über ihr individuelles Leben hinaus einen gesamtgesellschaftlichen Effekt ausstrahlen soll. Allerdings werden Frauen hier nicht als von außen auszulösender Effekt dargestellt, sondern als selbstbestimmte und vielfältige Individuen, die sich durch kollektive Selbstermächtigung ein gemeinschaftliches Leben aufbauen und ihre Erfahrungen selbst nach außen tragen. Die Bewohnerinnen des Dorfes berichten in Newslettern und bei Vorträgen von ihren Anstrengungen, sich inmitten des anhaltenden Bürgerkriegs in Syrien frei von Gewalt und Unterdrückung ein neues Leben, Arbeiten und Miteinander zu ermöglichen sowie von dem Baufortschritt in Jinwar.

Mit ihrer gemeinschaftlichen Lebensweise möchten die Frauen in Jinwar an prähistorische Gesellschaftsstrukturen im heutigen Mesopotamien anknüpfen, die sie als kollektiv, kommunal, ökologisch und matriarchal geprägt beschreiben. So bauen sie beispielsweise bewusst auf traditionelle und nachhaltige Weise. Die dabei verwendeten Lehmziegel stellen sie selbst her und beziehen alle notwendigen Rohstoffe aus der Region. Auch der große, ökologisch bewirtschaftete Gemeinschaftsgarten erfüllt die Anforderungen eines autarken und selbstbestimmten Lebensstils. Während westliche Entwicklungsagenturen Frauen im globalen Süden in einer eindimensionalen Weise darstellen, um sie in bestehende Formen der Wertschöpfung einzugliedern, wird in Jinwar stattdessen ein umfassenderes Frauenbildes verkörpert, das die autonom gewählte Selbstorganisation und angesichts der Schrecken des syrischen Bürgerkriegs beispielsweise auch die Möglichkeit zur Selbstverteidigung einschließt, wie die Kooperation der Frauen in Jinwar mit den Frauenverteidigungseinheiten in Nordsyrien (kurdisch: Yekîneyên Parastina Jin, YPJ) zeigt.

Das Frauenbild, das in Jinwar vermittelt wird, geht somit weit über die passive Rolle hinaus, die Frauen und Mädchen im dominanten Paradigma der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit gemeinhin zugewiesen wird. Hier werden Frauen nicht einseitig als strebsam, kooperativ und regelrecht harmlos dargestellt, sondern zudem als autark, streitbar und politisch. Dies bietet zahlreiche Anknüpfungspunkte, welche die internationale Entwicklungszusammenarbeit aufnehmen könnte, wenn sie Frauen nicht als Mittel zum Zweck, sondern als selbstbestimmte, heterogene und politische Subjekte wahrnehmen möchte.

 

Max Jansen

Max P. Jansen studiert Friedens- und Konfliktforschung mit einem Schwerpunkt auf Gender Studies, Zivilgesellschaft und Cybersecurity an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und der TU Darmstadt. Neben seinem Studium arbeitet er für eine in Frankfurt ansässige Hilfs- und Menschenrechtsorganisation und veröffentlicht in unregelmäßigen Abständen Beiträge auf www.freitag.de/autoren/max-jansen.

Mehr Schein als Sein. Geschlechtergerechtigkeit in den Vereinten Nationen

Mehr Schein als Sein. Geschlechtergerechtigkeit in den Vereinten Nationen

Von Manuela Scheuermann 

Die Vereinten Nationen  bemühen sich redlich, Maßnahmen zu mehr Geschlechtergerechtigkeit in allen Teilen der Welt anzustoßen. Doch sie selbst verharren  in tradierten Mustern – mit tiefgreifenden Folgen für die Geschlechtergleichheit in der eigenen Organisation. Mögen jüngste Entwicklungen, wie die Geschlechterparität in einigen großen Sonderorganisationen, ein positiveres Bild einer gender-sensiblen UN zeichnen, so zeigt doch gerade der wichtige Tätigkeitsbereich „Frieden und Sicherheit“, dass die UN noch einen langen Weg vor sich haben. Systemische Hindernisse auf politischer und bürokratischer Ebene verhindern Geschlechtergerechtigkeit innerhalb der Weltorganisation.

Eine Weltorganisation setzt Normen

Die United Nations (UN) inszenieren sich seit geraumer Zeit als Vorreiterin, Vordenkerin und Normsetzerin für Geschlechtergerechtigkeit. Seit dem Amtsantritt von Antonio Guterres wurden die Appelle der UN an die Staatengemeinschaft, Gender-Belange ernst zu nehmen, noch lauter. Anlässlich des Weltfrauentags 2019 unterstrich der UN-Generalsekretär, die Förderung der weiblichen Hälfte der Weltbevölkerung sei essentiell für den globalen Fortschritt. Dies ist insbesondere in dem für die Vereinten Nationen konstitutiven Tätigkeitsbereich „Frieden und Sicherheit“ der Fall. Fotos von Frauen in Uniform dominieren den Internetauftritt der für Friedenssicherung zuständigen Abteilung „Department for Peace Operations“ (DPO). Die Intensivierung des „Women, Peace and Security“-Programms steht auch – und gerade durch deutsche Initiativen – während der nicht-ständigen Mitgliedschaft Deutschlands von 2019 bis 2020 im UN-Sicherheitsrat hoch auf der Tagesordnung.

Dabei dominiert im UN-Diskurs ein friedenspolitisches Narrativ von Geschlechtergerechtigkeit: der Schutz von Frauen vor sexualisierter oder gender-basierter Gewalt, die Bewahrung von Frauenrechten als Menschenrechten und der Einbezug, ja die aktive Partizipation, von Frauen in allen Phasen des Friedensprozesses als zwingende Voraussetzung für einen nachhaltigen, stabilen und positiven Frieden. Frauen werden dabei in den Friedensoperationen theoretisch mittlerweile alle Rollen zugedacht, die Männern von Beginn an zustanden. Frauen sollen als Vermittlerinnen in Friedensverhandlungen, als Kandidatinnen für Wahlen, und als Polizistinnen und Soldatinnen zu UN-Friedensoperationen beitragen. Sie alle sollen als Vorbild, als „role model“, dienen, aber auch die Kommunikation mit der weiblichen Bevölkerung in den Einsatzgebieten erleichtern. Frauen bringen einzigartige Fähigkeiten in Friedensprozesse ein. Deshalb sind Anstrengungen für Gender-Parität, Gender-Mainstreaming und Gender-Sensibilität wichtig. Das ist die Botschaft der United Nations.

Gender-Misere in UN-Friedensoperationen

Sieht man jedoch hinter diese glitzernde Fassade, zeigt bereits der Blick auf die Verhältnisse innerhalb der Weltorganisation, dass Worte und Taten noch immer stark auseinanderklaffen. Auch wenn der Anteil von Polizistinnen und zivilen UN-Mitarbeiterinnen stetig steigt, stagniert der Anteil an Soldatinnen in UN-Friedensoperationen auf niedrigem Niveau. Seit mehr als einem Jahrzehnt verharrt er bei etwa vier Prozent. Die Appelle des UN-Generalsekretärs scheinen vor allem in militärischen Belangen ungehört zu verhallen. Er mahnte anlässlich der letztjährigen Generaldebatte zu „Women, Peace and Security“ an, die UN würden sowohl ihre Glaubwürdigkeit als auch ihre Fähigkeiten zum Schutz der Zivilbevölkerung verlieren, wenn die UN-Blauhelmkontingente weiterhin fast ausschließlich männlich werden. Gerade der Schutz-Aspekt ist ein zentraler Aufgabenbereich der UN-Peacekeeper und gerade hier leisten weibliche Soldatinnen einen essentiellen Beitrag. Nachweislich sinkt die sexualisierte Gewalt gegen die weibliche Zivilbevölkerung, das Vertrauen in die UN-Friedensmission steigt und das Fehlverhalten der männlichen Peacekeeper verringert sich, wenn mehr Frauen in UN-Uniform vor Ort sind. Es ist also keineswegs nur ein Zahlenspiel, das die UN antreibt mehr Frauen als Soldatinnen in UN-Friedensoperationen zu entsenden, sondern die Überzeugung dass Frauen einen echten Mehrwert bringen – für die Kultur innerhalb der Mission und für die Friedensbemühungen vor Ort.

Männliche Institution verhindert Geschlechtergerechtigkeit

Der Schuldige dieser Gender-Balancing-Misere in UN-Friedensoperationen ist meist schnell ausgemacht: Es sind die truppenstellenden Staaten, die keine Frauen in die Operationen entsenden, so die landläufige, insbesondere von der UN vertretene Position. Dabei tragen die Vereinten Nationen, insbesondere das DPO, selbst einen beträchtlichen Anteil an dieser Gender-Misere. Die Verantwortung muss demnach bei beiden Protagonisten, den UN und den Truppenstellern, gesucht werden. Dies wird nicht so sehr auf dem sogenannten Makro-Level, also der politischen Ebene sichtbar, sondern auf dem Mikro-Level, den Mechanismen der bürokratischen Institution DPO.

Insbesondere das DPO pflegt noch immer einen auffallend männlichen Managementstil. Dadurch werden Frauen bewusst und unbewusst ausgeschlossen. Diese Praxis soll mit einigen Beispielen aus der Alltagsroutine der DPO veranschaulicht werden. Überwiegend männliche Leitungsgremien (1), gender-unsensible Auswahlprozesse bei der Besetzung von Posten (2) und – wie jüngst bekannt wurde – sexuelle Belästigung am Arbeitsplatz (3) sind immer noch an der Tagesordnung.

(1) Das mächtige, weil für alle UN-Friedensoperationen zuständige, DPO wird von sechs altgedienten Führungspersönlichkeiten geleitet, darunter nur eine Frau. Dieses mit Männern durchsetzte Bild einer Führung verwundert nicht, und dies aus vielerlei Gründen. Zum einen ist das DPO die einzige Institution der durch und durch zivilen UN, die sich mit militärischen Fragen auseinandersetzt. Folgt man feministischen Thesen wie der einer „military masculinity“, die unter anderem von Kronsell vertreten wird, wird klar, dass die Institution Militär per se maskulin ist, und ein militärisch arbeitendes DPO demnach vor allem Männer und männliche Verhaltensweisen honoriert – von der männlichen Stellenbeschreibung bis zum männlichen Führungsstil und männlichen „leader“. Zwar arbeiten die UN in vielen ihrer Nebenorgane und Programme gegen diese „Maskulinität“ an, indem sie bewusst Förderprogramme für Frauen in Leitungspositionen auflegen. Diese zeigen aber gerade im DPO wenig Effekt. Innerhalb der Missionen kommt noch eine weitere Herausforderung hinzu, die Frauen geradezu abschreckt, in einer Führungsposition zu dienen. In den UN herrscht die Praxis vor, Leitungspositionen in UN-Friedensoperationen gewohnheitsmäßig als „no family duty“ zu kennzeichnen – also die Mitnahme von Familienangehörigen zu untersagen. Dies mag in hoch volatilen Gebieten seinen Sinn haben, möchte man die Familie nicht den Gefahren aussetzen, die gewaltsame Konflikt mit sich bringen. In Missionen, die eher beobachtender Natur sind macht das schlicht keinen Sinn. Beachtet man dabei noch, dass Leitungspositionen stets mehrjährige Stehzeiten bedeuten, die wenigsten Frau jedoch für zwei oder mehr Jahre von ihrer Familie getrennt sein möchten, liegt in UN-Friedensmissionen letztendlich eine doppelte Diskriminierung vor: die der Frau und die der Mutter.

(2) Weitere Hinderungsgründe für die Partizipation von Frauen im DPO sind die generell „männlich“ definierten Anforderungen und die Besetzungspraxis innerhalb der UN. Beispielsweise werden die Aufgaben, die im DPO und im Feld geleistet werden müssen in den Stellengesuchen der UN oftmals in einen ausgesprochen militärischen Sprachjargon eingebettet. Das ist selbst bei zivilen Tätigkeiten der Fall. Zivile Frauen werden dadurch häufig abgeschreckt. Zudem führt eine von Männern dominierte Besetzungspraxis dazu, dass Frauen zumeist auf den unteren Karrierebenen verharren. In den UN erfolgen interne Besetzungen nämlich durch informelles Mentoring – in der Regel von Mann zu Mann. Männliche Einsteiger werden von männlichen Abteilungsleitern gecoacht und für neue Positionen vorgeschlagen. Frauen bleiben in diesem männlichen Netzwerk außen vor.

(3) Dazu kommt ein die gesamte UN schwächendes System der Herabwürdigung von Frauen. Wie jüngste Studien belegen, ist sexuelle Belästigung an der Tagesordnung. Eine unter allen UN-Mitarbeiter_innen durchgeführte Befragung kam zu dem Ergebnis, dass ein Drittel des UN-Staff sexuelle Belästigung am Arbeitsplatz erlebt hat. Dass nur 17 Prozent der 30.000 UN-Mitarbeiter_innen die Umfrage beantwortet hat, spricht nach Ansicht des UN-Generalsekretärs Bände. „The Guardian“ spricht in einem Artikel im Januar 2019 in Bezug auf sexuelle Belästigung in der UN von einer “Kultur der Straflosigkeit”. Die Vereinten Nationen haben ein systemisches Diskriminierungsproblem. Und dies obwohl sich die UN mit angeblich hocheffektiven Programmen gegen Diskriminierung am Arbeitsplatz schmücken.

Ausblick

Diese systemischen Stolpersteine auf dem Weg zu Gendergerechtigkeit sind den Vereinten Nationen durchaus bewusst und in vielen nicht-militärischen Bereichen sind überraschend positive Schritte hin zu Geschlechterparität zu beobachten. Doch wird sich die tiefgreifende Ungerechtigkeit, die sich besonders im DPO beobachten lässt, auch in Zukunft schwer ändern lassen. Die Vereinten Nationen sind von Männern gegründet, ein „Männerverein“ mit einer männlichen Kultur und auf einem männlichen institutionellen Pfad, von dem sie nur schwer abkehren können. Das wiegt im DPO, einer zusätzlich noch militärisch institutionalisierten Abteilung, noch schwerer.

Es muss deshalb nicht verwundern  dass – folgt man Hochrechnung der UN – das DPO Geschlechterparität frühestens im Jahre 2182 erreichen wird. Es sind die alten, einer militärisch arbeitenden Institution traditionell inhärenten Pfade, die eine geschlechtergerechte Öffnung des UN-Apparats im Bereich von Frieden und Sicherheit verhindern. Es sind eben nicht nur die offensichtlichen, entschuldigend und anklagend angeführten Argumente, allen voran der Mangel an weiblichen Soldatinnen in den truppenstellenden Nationen, die der Geschlechtergerechtigkeit im Wege stehen. Das DPO ist noch immer eine militärisch-maskuline Einrichtung. Das wird wahrscheinlich auch weiterhin so bleiben – mit allen entsprechenden Auswirkungen für einen nachhaltigen, stabilen und positiven Frieden.

 

Foto: Gerd Bayer

Dr. Manuela Scheuermann ist Post-Doc und wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Jean-Monnet-Lehrstuhl des Instituts für Politikwissenschaft und Soziologie der Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg. Sie beschäftigt sich mit Gender-Normen in internationalen Sicherheitsorganisationen, inter-organisationalen Beziehungen und den Vereinten Nationen